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Número de publicaciónWO1995015543 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudPCT/GB1994/002650
Fecha de publicación8 Jun 1995
Fecha de presentación2 Dic 1994
Fecha de prioridad3 Dic 1993
Número de publicaciónPCT/1994/2650, PCT/GB/1994/002650, PCT/GB/1994/02650, PCT/GB/94/002650, PCT/GB/94/02650, PCT/GB1994/002650, PCT/GB1994/02650, PCT/GB1994002650, PCT/GB199402650, PCT/GB94/002650, PCT/GB94/02650, PCT/GB94002650, PCT/GB9402650, WO 1995/015543 A1, WO 1995015543 A1, WO 1995015543A1, WO 9515543 A1, WO 9515543A1, WO-A1-1995015543, WO-A1-9515543, WO1995/015543A1, WO1995015543 A1, WO1995015543A1, WO9515543 A1, WO9515543A1
InventoresGordon Mcnally
SolicitanteMcnally Gaming Limited
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos:  Patentscope, Espacenet
Roulette-like gaming machine
WO 1995015543 A1
Resumen
A gaming machine has a roulette wheel (13) behind a glass screen (11). There are means (33, 34, 35, 36) for determining the position of the wheel as it rotates and means (29, 30) for detecting a ball (28) settled in a pocket (27) at the periphery of the wheel when that pocket passes a fixed point. From these, the number selected by the ball is ascertained. Before the wheel (13) is spun, the machine or the player selects a number or numbers, and the player enters his stake. The ball (28) is jerked from its previous pocket (27) by the wheel start-up and finds another one at random. If the number so chosen corresponds with the preselected one, a prize is awarded. Additional features can generate further prizes.
Reclamaciones  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)
CLAIMS 1. A coin or token-operated gaming machine characterised by a wheel (13) visible but inaccessible to a player, means (14, 15, 16) for rotating the wheel for a period when a game is initiated, thereby to cause a ball (28) to move randomly and then settle in one of a plurality of separately identifiable positions (27) on the wheel (13) when the wheel stops, means for selecting a symbol corre¬ sponding to one of said positions (27) on the wheel (13) previous to the settlement of the ball (28), means (30, 34, 36) for detecting the position in which the ball (28) does settle, means for correlating that settled position with the selected symbol, and means (22) for awarding a prize if said settled position corresponds to the selected symbol.
2. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 1, characterised in that the wheel (13) and its symbols simulate a conventional roulette wheel.
3. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 2, characterised by a selection display representing a roulette wheel (4) or table, and in that a selected symbol is illuminated in its corresponding sector.
4. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 1, 2 or 3, characterised in that means are provided to enable the player to make the symbol selection.
5. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 1, 2 or 3, characterised in that the symbol selection is carried out by the machine.
6. A gaming machine as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that the player can select, or ask the machine to select (18), more than one symbol, the more that are selected, the less being the potential prize.
7. A gaming machine as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that it is adapted (19) to allow the player to choose how much to stake up to a limit, the more that is staked, the greater being the potential prize.
8. A gaming machine as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that a further random or apparently random selector (7) is provided, and operates in conjunction with the wheel, co-incidence of a symbol chosen by this selector (7) with the symbol selected by the ball generating a prize.
9. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 8, characterised in that if a symbol selected by the first selecting means (18) coincides with that chosen by the random selector (7) and with that selected by the ball (28) , an extra prize is generated.
10. A gaming machine as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that it is adapted to award extra high or "super" prizes if the ball (28) does not just come to rest in a winning position on the wheel (13) , but if also the wheel (13) stops in a particular orientation (37) .
11. A gaming machine as claimed in any preceding claim, characterised in that the wheel position at any time is determined by pulse generating and counting means (34, 36) .
12. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 11, characterised in that means (30) are provided to generate a pulse from a settled ball (28) passing a fixed point, whereby the position of the settled ball on the wheel (13) , and hence the symbol randomly chosen by it, is determined by correlating the ball detection pulse with information from the pulse generating and counting means (34, 36) and the known sequence of symbols around the wheel.
13. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 12, characterised in that the settled ball (28) is detected by optical means (30) .
14. A gaming machine as claimed in Claim 12 or 13, characterised in that there is a plurality of fixed points around the wheel each of which has ball detecting means (30) .
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

ROULETTE-LIKE GAMING MACHINE

This invention relates to gaming machines. It is concerned with one using a roulette feature to determine what prize is won. There have been many machines attempting to simulate the game of roulette, but generally they have not been particularly realistic, the wheel being a projection on a video screen, for example. Among other drawbacks, the player will often have a suspicion that this can be electronically rigged so that the odds are always in the machine's favour. With a real wheel and ball, this suspicion may be allayed, and in any event it would be a more attractive machine for the player to use.

According to the present invention, there is provided a coin or token-operated gaming machine comprising a wheel visible but inaccessible to a player, means for rotating the wheel for a period when a game is initiated, thereby to cause a ball to move randomly and then settle in one of a plurality of separately identifiable positions on the wheel when the wheel stops, means for selecting a symbol corres¬ ponding to one of said positions on the wheel previous to the settlement of the ball, means for detecting the position in which the ball does settle, means for correlating that settled position with the selected symbol, and means for awarding a prize if said settled position corresponds to the selected symbol.

If conventional roulette is to be simulated, the symbols will be numbers presented on black and red back- grounds, and the roulette wheel in appearance will be as close as possible to those found in casinos. However, there are many different options, and the symbols may take various forms. For example, there may simply be differently coloured zones, or they may be shown as dice or as signs of the zodiac. The description later will, for convenience, just refer to numbers.

In the preferred form, there is a selection display representing a roulette wheel or table, with a selected symbol illuminated in its corresponding sector.

Means may be provided to enable the player to make the symbol selection, or that selection may be carried out by the machine. However, the player will generally be able to select, or ask the machine to select, more than one symbol, but the more that are selected, the less will be the potential prize.

The player may also choose how much to stake, up to a limit. For example, there may be a basic stake corresponding to one coin, and multiples thereof. The more that is staked, the greater is the potential prize.

There may be a further random or apparently random selector which operates in conjunction with the wheel, co¬ incidence of a symbol chosen by this selector with the symbol chosen by the ball generating a prize. In addition, if a symbol selected by the first selecting means coincides with that chosen by the random selector and with that selected by the ball, an extra prize is generated. This random selector may be presented as a window in a display panel in which the symbols flash up in sequence and then stop, preferably after the wheel has stopped.

Extra high or "super" prizes may be awarded if the ball does not just come to rest in a winning position on the wheel, but if also the wheel stops in a particular orienta¬ tion, for example with the ball opposite a super prize position or zone.

The determination of the wheel position at any time can be achieved by pulse generating and counting devices. Means may also be provided to generate a pulse from a settled ball passing a fixed point, whereby the position of the selected ball on the wheel, and hence the symbol randomly chosen by it, is determined by correlating the ball detection pulse with information from the pulse generating and counting means and the known sequence of symbols around the wheel.

Conveniently, the settled ball is detected by optical means, and for speedy response there may be a plurality of fixed points around the wheel each of which has ball detecting means. For a better understanding of the invention, one embodiment will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of a gaming machine with a roulette feature, Figure 2 is a side elevation of the machine of Figure

1,

Figure 3 is a plan view of the machine of Figure 1, Figure 4 is another front elevation of the machine of Figure 1 but with face panels removed,

Figure 5 is a part side elevation, part vertical section on the line V-V of Figure 6 of a roulette wheel and associated sensors forming part of the machine, and Figure 6 is a diagrammatic underneath plan view of the roulette wheel and its drive.

The machine is housed in a cabinet 1 which bears a resemblance to that of many other gaming machines, but which is tailored to accommodate the particular features described below. At the top there is a front panel 2 laid out in grid form to display potential awards for wins in accordance with how much is staked, and how random or apparently random elements finish. Below this there is another panel 3, in the centre of which there is a ring 4 divided in the manner of a roulette wheel, each sector showing a different number.

In an alternative presentation (not shown) instead of the ring there may be a panel with the numbers in a grid replicating the cloth or table layout of the real game. Within the ring 4 there are windows, the window 5 having two functions, the usual one being the display of a credit meter, the window 6 displaying the stake, and the window 7 showing a number corresponding to one of those on the roulette ring. The other function of the window 5 is to show a light, possibly flashing, if the cabinet 1 is tilted in an attempt to influence the game. A warning bell may sound in addition. A fourth window 8 is also dual purpose indicating the number selected by the roulette feature and, subsequently, the prize or award gained by a win. Behind these panels 2 and 3 there are respectively a matrix bulb system 9 and a circuit board 10 as seen in Figure 4. The bulbs on the matrix 9 can be selectively lit to illuminate appropriate numbers on the panel 2, and bulbs around the perimeter of the board 10 light sequentially to simulate the rolling of a ball around a roulette wheel, and this is visible on the ring 4.

At about the mid height of the cabinet 1, a transparent glass 11 slopes downwardly and forwardly from the bottom of the panel 3 to a control shelf 12. In a chamber below this glass 11 there is a roulette wheel 13 which is spun when the machine is activated by a stepper motor 14 through a toothed belt 15 and reduction gears 16 (Figure 6) . The wheel will be described in more detail below. The shelf 12 carries a coin entry slot 17 at one end and centrally a set of bet buttons 18. There is also a button 19 for selecting the stake for a particular play, a repeat bet button 20 and a credit collect button 21. Below the overhang of the shelf 12 there is a cash tray 22. In the embodiment shown, each number is selected by the machine itself. However, it would be possible to provide a keypad, for example, whereby the player can choose the number or numbers on which he hopes to win.

Referring again to Figure 4, the cabinet 1 conceals a power pack 23 and a microprocessor 24 which governs all the functions of the machine in response to the various button operations, including the drive of the roulette wheel, the illumination of selected bulbs, and the payout of any prizes.

The roulette wheel 13, as best seen in Figure 5, is preferably of conventional form as far as possible, with a central capstan 25 and a shallow coned body 26 bounded by an annular array of pockets 27 in which a ball 28 will settle when all is at rest. These pockets 27, or their immediately adjacent parts, are marked with numbers in a corresponding way to those on the ring 4. Also, in the radially inner side of each pocket 27 there is a hole 29, and when the ball 28 is at rest in a pocket, it blocks off the associated hole. Fixed below the wheel and adjacent the annular array of pockets to register with these holes 29 as they pass just outside them are the emitters 30a of four evenly spaced photocell devices 30 whose receivers 30b are disposed outside the wheel 13 in radial alignment. Each of these will respond according to whether the hole 29 that passes is blocked or clear.

Beyond the peripheral pockets 27 the roulette wheel 13 has an uptilted rim 31 with a downwardly projecting skirt 32 from which a regular array of slots 33 are cut out from the bottom edge. These correspond to pocket positions, and an optical sensor 34 is used to count them as the roulette wheel 13 rotates. A datum position, conveniently correspon¬ ding to the zero on the wheel, is obtained by a finger 35 projecting down from the underside of the roulette wheel and passing once per revolution through another optical sensor 36. Thus, the position of the roulette wheel is known at all times by counting the responses from the slots 33 from each zero signal from the finger 35.

Immediately in front of the wheel 13, as shown in

Figure 3, there is an area 37 marked 'ball zone'. This is for determining an augmented prize as described below. Only one is shown, but there may be more, differentiating the extra prizes.

To play the game, a person enters coins in the slot 17 to build up credit. He may just put in one coin, or he may put in two, three or many more. The amount of credit he has available with which to play is indicated in the window 5. He then selects how many numbers on which he wants to bet, and this is done by pressing one of the bet buttons 18. In this machine he can choose up to five, but there may be more or less in other versions. He also selects the amount of money to be bet, using the stake button 19. The machine registers the input and then randomly selects that many numbers from those available on the ring 4 and on the roulette wheel 13. The wheel spins, either on release of the stake button 19 or by pressing another, start button (not shown in this example) jerking the ball 28 out of its previous resting place and sending it clattering round in the usual way of a roulette wheel. At the same time the number or numbers chosen by the machine for a potential prize are illuminated on the ring 4, preferably all the numbers flashing one by one in sequence around the ring but the chosen ones remaining lit. When the wheel starts to slow down, the ball finds its way into one particular pocket. Using the sensing devices 30, 34 and 36, this position, and hence the corresponding number, is ascertained and almost immediately flashed up in the window 8. While the wheel 13 is still rotating it may be difficult for the player to see what number the ball has selected. The use of four photocell devices 30 means that it takes at most only one quarter of a revolution for the machine to register that the ball has settled in a pocket. It would be possible to have just one, but the average response would be slow, and so several sensors are preferred. Of course, should the number randomly chosen by the ball correspond to the number or one of the numbers initially selected by the machine for the player, then a prize will be won.

The amount will depend on how much was originally staked, and how many numbers were bet upon. If the player took the risk of betting on only one number, then the prize will be greater than if he had bet on two, and so on, as the representative figures on the panel 2 in Figure 1 show. Likewise, if he invested two coins rather than one, the prize will be greater, and even more so with three coins. The amount won will be displayed in the window 8, replacing the winning number when the wheel has stopped.

While this has been happening, the window 7 will have been showing numbers in a rapidly changing sequence. This too stops, preferably just after the ball 28 has landed in a pocket, showing a randomly selected number. If that corresponds to the number on which the ball has landed and if that number is already a winning one, a bonus prize is awarded, and examples of these are also shown on the panel 2. If the number finally shown in the window 7 corresponds to that chosen by the ball, but that number is not one of the pre-selected ones shown on the ring 4, then there will be a small consolation prize as shown in the bottom line of the panel 2.

Even higher wins are a possibility if the roulette wheel finishes with the ball on a winning number and opposite the restricted ball zone 37, as shown in Figure 3.

Then the prize can be multiplied many times over as the right hand column of the panel 2 illustrates.

The normal wins achieved by the ball can be monitored. If there are only a few over a long period (i.e. if the machine is winning handsomely) the number finally displayed in the window 7 can be chosen not randomly but specifically to match the pocket into which the ball has fallen, thus generating a prize and encouraging play. Likewise, the wheel 13 can be halted intentionally with the ball opposite the restricted ball zone.

If the player wishes to play another game with the same number, the repeat button 20 is pressed. Provided the stake money has been entered, the machine operates again.

To change the stake, the button 19 is pressed. Insuffi¬ cient credits can be indicated by a warning noise, or recorded message, as well as visually on the meter 5. To collect winnings from the tray 22, the button 21 is pressed just once. As the coins are ejected one by one, the prize fund value showing in the window 8 is decremented.

There may also be integrated into the machine an interactive voice system representing a roulette table croupier. As well as giving instructions at each stage of play, it may also serve for giving out commercials when the machine is not in use.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
EP0046306A1 *19 Ago 198124 Feb 1982Perner, ErichRoulette game
EP0208857A1 *9 May 198621 Ene 1987Kurt M. SchürmannMethod to pay out a win and apparatus for carrying out this method
EP0513363A1 *4 Oct 199119 Nov 1992Kabushiki Kaisha Ace DenkenSlot machine
GB2174010A * Título no disponible
GB2187320A * Título no disponible
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US847482022 Sep 20062 Jul 2013IgtCustomizable display of roulette betting layout
Clasificaciones
Clasificación internacionalG07F17/34
Clasificación cooperativaG07F17/3213, G07F17/3262
Clasificación europeaG07F17/32C2F2, G07F17/32M2
Eventos legales
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