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Número de publicaciónWO1999006770 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudPCT/AU1998/000592
Fecha de publicación11 Feb 1999
Fecha de presentación28 Jul 1998
Fecha de prioridad1 Ago 1997
También publicado comoCA2297761A1
Número de publicaciónPCT/1998/592, PCT/AU/1998/000592, PCT/AU/1998/00592, PCT/AU/98/000592, PCT/AU/98/00592, PCT/AU1998/000592, PCT/AU1998/00592, PCT/AU1998000592, PCT/AU199800592, PCT/AU98/000592, PCT/AU98/00592, PCT/AU98000592, PCT/AU9800592, WO 1999/006770 A1, WO 1999006770 A1, WO 1999006770A1, WO 9906770 A1, WO 9906770A1, WO-A1-1999006770, WO-A1-9906770, WO1999/006770A1, WO1999006770 A1, WO1999006770A1, WO9906770 A1, WO9906770A1
InventoresKenneth Barrie Dunbar, Stuart Barrie Dunbar
SolicitanteKenneth Barrie Dunbar, Stuart Barrie Dunbar
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos:  Patentscope, Espacenet
Gas fuelled fire lighter torch
WO 1999006770 A1
Resumen
A fire lighter having a handle (110), a tube (120) extending axially through the handle and having a gas injection nozzle therein, the tube having an inlet end (118) extending axially beyond a first end (114) of the handle (110), the inlet end (118) having a valve (122) to control the supply of a gas to the fire lighter; the tube (120) also having an elongate outlet end (128) extending axially beyond a second end (116) of the handle (110), the outlet end (128) having a plurality of gas outlet apertures (130) therealong, the outlet end (128) being closed at its outer end (132).
Reclamaciones  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)
1. A fire lighter having a handle, a tube extending axially through the handle and having a gas injection nozzle therein, the tube having an inlet end extending axially beyond a first end of the handle, the inlet end having a valve to control the supply of a gas to the fire lighter; the tube also having an elongate outlet end extending axially beyond a second end of the handle, the outlet end having a plurality of gas outlet apertures therealong, the outlet end being closed at its outer end.
2. A fire lighter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the tube is coaxial with the handle for the length of the tube.
3. A fire lighter as claimed in claim 1, wherein the outlet end is angled relative to the handle.
4. A fire lighter as claimed in claim 3, wherein the angle is created by having the outlet end at an angle to the axis of the handle from approximately the second end of the handle.
5. A fire lighter as claimed in claim 3, wherein there is provided an offset portion extending at a substantial angle to the axis of the handle, and then substantially parallel to the axis of the handle.
6. A fire lighter as claimed in anyone of claims 3 to 5, wherein the angle is greater than 30 degrees.
7. A fire lighter as claimed in any one of claims 3 to 6, wherein the angle is approximately 90 degrees.
8. A fire lighter as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 7, wherein the handle is provided with an air inlet to enable the combustion of the gas.
9. A fire lighter as claimed in anyone of claims 1 to 8, wherein the gas outlet apertures are arranged longitudinally along the outlet end and are substantially equally spaced on either side of the tube, extending radially outwardly.
10. A fire lighter as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 9, the outlet tube is bifurcated or trifurcated.
11. A fire lighter as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 10, wherein the outlet tube is provided with a guard extending along the portion thereof having the gas outlet apertures, the guard being located adjacent the gas outlet apertures so as to prevent fuel in the fire being ignited from blocking the gas outlet apertures or otherwise interfering with the gas flow.
12. A fire lighter as claimed in claim 11, wherein the guard is any one or more of a ring, a plurality of longitudinally extending rods, a plurality of transversely extending rods, a plate, or a grill.
13. A fire lighter substantially as hereinbefore described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

GAS FUELLED FERE LIGHTER TORCH

Field of the Invention This invention relates to a fire lighter and refers particularly to a fire lighter for lighting fires without the use of paper, kindling or similar devices, but wherein a gas is used.

Background of the Invention

With the lighting of fires the traditional method has been to use paper, kindling and other wood to light the fire. This has meant the storing of paper, the chopping of kindling and the wood, the time taken to set the fire, and to ignite it. Quite often, the fire will not ignite correctly. This is the normal method whether the fire be for wood, logs, briquettes, charcoal, heat beads, or other similar solid hydro carbons. As a recent development, there have been supplied to the market fire lighters in the form of solid cubes of a highly absorbent material saturated with a liquid hydrocarbon. These fire lighters emit a large amount of smoke, and very strong fumes. Again, they have also proven to be not highly reliable, particularly when starting large fires.

Furthermore, for fires with a chimney, until the fire is alight there is insufficient heat to warm the air within the fireplace to cause the air to rise into the chimney, thus allowing new air to be drawn into the fire. This can cause oxygen starvation and thus failure, incomplete or slowness in the fire commencing full combustion.

With other fires such as those in barbeques, including kettle barbeques, there can be considerable difficulty in lighting the fire and having it at the correct operating temperature within the required time. The use of the liquid hydrocarbon fire lighters requires the fire to have been burning for some time before it can be used so that all of the fumes, odours and smoke is eliminated prior to food being cooked. This itself causes difficulty. For the form of kettle barbecue known as "Weber" they have acknowledged that the most often asked question is how to have the coals or heat beads ignited quickly, easily and reliably, and in sufficient time for the food to be cooked.

The present invention seeks therefore to provide a device which will enable the lighting of fires using gas rather than the solid fuel means that have been used hitherto. Brief Description of the Invention

The present invention provides a fire lighter having a handle, a tube extending axially through the handle and having a gas injection nozzle therein, the tube having an inlet end extending axially beyond a first end of the handle, the inlet end having a valve to control the supply of a gas to the fire lighter; the tube also having an elongate outlet end extending axially beyond a second end of the handle, the outlet end having a plurality of gas outlet apertures therealong, the outlet end being closed at its outer end.

The tube may be coaxial with the handle for its entire length or the outlet end may be angled relative to the handle. The angle may be by being at an angle to the axis of the handle from approximately the second end of the handle; or may be by having an offset portion extending at a substantial angle to the axis of the handle, and then substantially parallel to the axis of the handle. This would make the outlet end of the tube somewhat crank shaped. The substantial angle may be greater than 30 degrees, and may even be approximately 90 degrees. Advantageously, the handle is provided with an air inlet to enable the combustion of the gas.

Preferably, the gas outlet apertures are arranged longitudinally along the outlet end and are substantially equally spaced on either side of the tube, extending radially outwardly.

The outlet tube may be bifurcated, trifurcated, or so forth. The outlet tube or tubes may be provided with a guard extending along the portion thereof having the gas outlet apertures, the guard being located adjacent the gas outlet apertures, so as to prevent the fuel being ignited from blocking the gas outlet apertures or otherwise interfering with the gas flow. The guard may be of any form including a ring, a plurality of longitudinally extending rods, a plurality of transversely extending rods, a plate, grill or otherwise.

Description of the Drawings

In order that the invention may be understood there shall now be described by way of non- limitative example only preferred embodiments incorporating the principal features of the present invention, the description being with reference to the accompanying illustrative drawings in which: Figure 1 is a rear perspective view from below of a first embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side view of the embodiment of Figure 1 ;

Figure 3 is a side view of a second embodiment; Figure 4 is a front perspective view from above of a third embodiment;

Figure 5 is a perspective view from the front and above of a fourth embodiment;

Figure 6 is a side view of the embodiment of Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a front perspective view from above of a fifth embodiment of the present invention; Figure 8 is a side view of the embodiment of Figure 7;

Figure 9 is a front perspective view from above of a sixth embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 10 is a front perspective view from above of a seventh embodiment;

Figure 11 is a perspective view from the rear and beneath of an eighth embodiment of the present invention ;

Figure 12 is a perspective view from above of a ninth embodiment; and

Figure 13 is a perspective view from above of a tenth embodiment.

Description of the Preferred Embodiments

Throughout the description of the preferred embodiments, identical reference numerals are used for identical components except that a prefix number is used to designate which embodiment is relevant. Therefore, the description in relation to the first embodiment has a prefix number 1, for the second embodiment prefix number 2, and so forth.

To refer to the first embodiment illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, there is shown a fire lighter which has an elongate handle 110 which is generally cylindrical. However, it may be any appropriate shape.

The handle 110 is hollow having a central bore extending therethrough to form a tube through the centre of the handle 110. An air inlet hole 112 is provided in the handle 110 for air to gain access to the central tube so that air can mix with gas passing therethrough to enable the gas to be ignited. A gas injector nozzle is located in the central tube adjacent the air inlet hole 12.

The handle 110 has a first end 114 and a second end 116. Extending axially outwardly from first end 114 is an inlet end 118 of a tube 120 which is a continuation of the tube extending through the centre of handle 110. To the inlet end 118 there is secured valve 122 which has a valve handle 124 so that the inlet of gas can be controlled. A gas connector 126 is provided to enable normal bottled or other gas to be able to be supplied to the fire lighter.

The tube 120 has an outlet end 128 which is a continuation of the tube passing through the centre of handle 110. Along the length of outlet end 128 there are a plurality of gas outlet apertures 130 which extend through the wall of outlet end 128 to the hollow interior of outlet end 128. The gas outlet apertures 130 are generally equally spaced along part of the length of outlet end 128, and extend on either side of the outlet end 128. The gas outlet apertures 130 extend generally transversely to the longitudinal axis of outlet end 128. Outlet end 28 is closed at its outer end 132.

When bottled or other gas is supplied to the fire lighter through the gas connector 126, handle 124 is turned to the "on" position to enable valve 122 to admit gas to inlet portion 118 and thus the injector nozzle, with air being drawn through hole 112 by the Venturi effect to mix with the gas. The gas air mixture then passes along outlet end 128 and through gas outlet apertures 130. Upon an appropriate ignition device being used (eg match, cigarette lighter, or other similar device) the gas passing through the outlet apertures 130 will ignite. At this stage the fire lighter can be placed in the fire with wood or the fuel to be combusted above it so that the gas passing through gas outlet apertures 130 will ignite the fuel to be burnt. When the fuel is well alight, the handle 124 can be turned to stop the supply of gas, and the fire lighter removed from the fire. Combustion will then continue. In this way, the fire lighter can be used to light a fire without the use of paper, kindling, or other solid fire lighters.

Also, by virtue of the heat generated by the burning gas, the air in the fire is heated to created a drawing effect much earlier. This assists early combustion of the fuel. The fire lighter can also be used even after combustion has commenced if, for example, extra logs are added to a fire and they do not ignite fully. The fire lighter can then be turned on by rotation of the handle 124 to open valve 122. If the fire lighter is then placed in the fire, the hot coals or embers in the fire will ignite the gas passing through gas outlet apertures 130 and cause ignition of the gas. It can then be left in the fire for a number of minutes until the new fuel has ignited. The fire lighter can be used with any form of solid fuel such as wood, briquettes, charcoal, coal, heat beads, or the like; in solid fuel burning appliances; or with gas-fired appliances such as stoves, barbeques, heaters, hot water services, central heating units, or other similar services.

To refer to the embodiment of Figure 3, this is substantially the same as the embodiment of Figure 1 and therefore the general operation of this embodiment and much of its construction will not be described in detail. The principal difference is that between second end 216 and outlet end of tube 228 there is an intermediate portion 234. The intermediate portion is angled relative to the tube 220 at second end 216 by a substantial angle. The angle illustrated is approximately 60 degrees, although any angle from somewhere approaching 30 degrees through to approximately 90 degrees may be used. At the outer end of intermediate portion 234 the outlet end 228 is angled relative thereto so that outlet end 228 is substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of handle 210.

This form of fire lighter is useful when dealing with fires where the access to the fire is above that location where ignition is required. This may be relevant in situations where a slow combustion fire is being used, a kettle barbecue, a normal barbecue, slow combustion stove, or the like.

Figure 4 shows a third embodiment. This embodiment, like that of Figure 3, is similar in its operation to that of Figures 1 and 2 and therefore will not be described in great detail.

Again, the tube 320 has an intermediate portion 334 but which remains co-axial with the handle 310. The difference here is that the outlet end 328 is bifurcated so that two outlet ends 328(a) and 328(b) are provided. In the embodiment illustrated, these are identical, although they may be different if required. Each outlet end 328(a) and (328(b) is provided with gas outlet apertures 330, and closed ends 332, as with earlier embodiments. The operation of this embodiment is exactly the same as with the earlier embodiments. However, as can be imagined, with four sets of outlet flames (one on each side of each of the outlet ends 328(a) and (b)) the ignition of the fuel will be more substantial, and somewhat faster. This form may be of more use in larger fires.

In Figures 5 and 6 there is illustrated a further embodiment which, in reality, is a combination of the embodiments of Figures 3 and 4. Again, as a general operation of this embodiment is similar to the earlier embodiments, the operation will not be described in great detail.

Here the tube 420 is again bifurcated to form two outlet ends 428(a) and 428(b). As illustrated, these are identical, although this may not always be so. Again, each outlet end 428(a) and (b) has a plurality of transversely extending gas outlet apertures 430 on each side thereof, and closed ends 432. The intermediate portion 434 is again angled relative to tube 420 and the longitudinal axis of handle 410, although as can be seen from Figure 6 the angle in this instance approximates 90 degrees. The outlet ends 428(a) and (b) are somewhat parallel to the longitudinal axis of handle 410, although as can be seen from Figure 6 they are at an angle towards that axis. Again, with this embodiment, with the bifurcated outlet ends 428(a) and (b) faster combustion will be realised and, with the angled intermediate portion 434, the embodiment can be used with fires having some form of lip or other restriction of access to that region where ignition is to take place.

Outlet ends 428(a) and (b) may be placed into or under separate braziers which, after achieving ignition, may be placed in any required position such as, for example, a "Weber" barbecue.

In Figures 7 and 8 there is illustrated a fifth embodiment which is substantially identical to the embodiment of Figures 5 and 6 except that along the upper surface of outlet ends 5 to 8(a) and (b) there is provided a guard 536. The guard 536 has an axial extent at least as great as the axial extent of the outlet apertures 530. The purpose of guard 536 is to prevent fuel from falling and covering or otherwise obstructing the gas outlet apertures 530, and thus preventing or interfering with correct ignition of the fuel. In the form illustrated, the guard 536 has ends 538 and side rails 540. The side rails 540 extend beyond the width of the outlet ends 528(a) and (b) so that any fuel falling will strike the rails 540 and fall away from the outlet ends 528(a) and (b) and thus not block the gas outlet apertures 530. The guard 536 may be spaced from the outlet ends 528(a) and (b) by spacers 542, or may be flush therewith. It may be secured to the outlet ends 528(a) and (b) by welding, gluing, or other similar attachment.

Although the guard illustrated is somewhat elliptical, it may take the form of a plurality of spaced-apart substantially parallel bars extending transversely to the outer ends 528(a) and (b) by being located generally in the same area as guard 536 as illustrated. Alternatively, it may be a grill, plate or other suitable form.

To refer now to Figure 9, there is shown a sixth embodiment which, as before, is substantially similar to many of the earlier embodiments and therefore will not be described in great detail. As can be seen, in this instance the guard 636 has been placed on each of the outlet ends 628(a) and (b). The only difference with the guards is that end 638 are somewhat squarer rather than being curved.

It is to be noted here that the intermediate portion 634 is co-axial with the handle 610, but is somewhat angled in relation to the outlet ends 628(a) and (b).

In Figure 10 there is shown a seventh embodiment which is similar to the embodiment of Figure 3 but with a guard 736 fitted thereto. The guard 736 is similar to the guards 636 of the embodiment of Figure 9.

Another embodiment is illustrated in Figure 1 1 , which is similar to the embodiment of Figures 1 and 2, but with a guard 836 fitted; the guard 836 being similar to the guards 736 and 636. Figures 12 and 13 illustrate further embodiments where the guard 936 is in the form of a grill passing over and joining the two outlet ends 928(a) and (b). This form would be of advantage when dealing with briquettes because the briquettes are raised above the hearth allowing the igniting flames to spread beneath the briquettes. With the small surface area for a given volume in briquettes, ignition may thereby be achieved rapidly. The varying embodiments may also be used to directly heat or cook food placed thereon, whether or not in a cooking pan or the like. The outlet ends (and the handle) may be rotated through 180° to facilitate this function, but preferably the valve 122 is not rotated for ease of operation.

The fire lighters of the varying embodiments may be made of any suitable material such as, for example, brass, copper, steel, stainless steel, or any other material capable of withstanding the relatively high temperatures due to gas ignition, and/or a fire burning. The gas used may be any suitable gas such as liquefied petroleum gas, or other gas used in domestic or commercial situations.

Whilst there has been described in the foregoing description preferred constructions of fire lighters incorporating the principal features of the present invention, it will be understood by those skilled in the technology concerned that many variation or modifications in details of design of construction may be made without departing from the present invention.

It will be understood that the invention disclosed and defined herein extends to all alternative combinations of two or more of the individual features mentioned or evident from the text or drawings. All of these different combinations constitute various alternative aspects of the invention.

It will also be understood that where the term "comprises" or its grammatical variants, is employed herein, it is equivalent to the term "includes" and is not to be taken as excluding the presence of other elements or features.

Citas de patentes
Patente citada Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
AU1373766A * Título no disponible
US4422435 *24 Abr 198127 Dic 1983Spell William DPortable charcoal igniters or ignition systems and apparatus relating thereto
US4522585 *11 May 198411 Jun 1985Martin Steven JFireplace starter
US4891005 *23 Ago 19882 Ene 1990Carter Ralph EPortable igniter for fireplace logs
US5213075 *6 Ago 199125 May 1993Weber-Stephen Products Co.Igniter for charcoal grill
Citada por
Patente citante Fecha de presentación Fecha de publicación Solicitante Título
US701326322 Mar 200214 Mar 2006Mindfabric, Inc.Online interaction processing
USRE4303112 Mar 200813 Dic 2011MD Fab Capital L.L.C.Online interaction processing
Clasificaciones
Clasificación internacionalF23Q13/04
Clasificación cooperativaF23Q13/04
Clasificación europeaF23Q13/04
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