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Número de publicaciónWO2007094979 A1
Tipo de publicaciónSolicitud
Número de solicitudPCT/US2007/002950
Fecha de publicación23 Ago 2007
Fecha de presentación2 Feb 2007
Fecha de prioridad13 Feb 2006
También publicado comoCN101384649A, CN101384649B, EP1984433A1, EP1984433A4, EP1984433B1, US7463417, US20070188864
Número de publicaciónPCT/2007/2950, PCT/US/2007/002950, PCT/US/2007/02950, PCT/US/7/002950, PCT/US/7/02950, PCT/US2007/002950, PCT/US2007/02950, PCT/US2007002950, PCT/US200702950, PCT/US7/002950, PCT/US7/02950, PCT/US7002950, PCT/US702950, WO 2007/094979 A1, WO 2007094979 A1, WO 2007094979A1, WO-A1-2007094979, WO2007/094979A1, WO2007094979 A1, WO2007094979A1
InventoresJohn E. Duncan, Michael W. O'keefe, Roy A. Auerbach, Peter M. Olofson, Christopher R. Boyer, Ying-Yuh Lu, Jianhui Xia
Solicitante3M Innovative Properties Company
Exportar citaBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Enlaces externos:  Patentscope, Espacenet
Optical articles from curable compositions
WO 2007094979 A1
Resumen
A curable composition is provided comprising an oligomer having a plurality of pendent and/or terminal ethylenically unsaturated, free-radically polymerizable functional groups, a free-radically polymerizable crosslinking agent, and/or a diluent monomer, and a photoinitiator. The composition, when cured, is non-yellowing, exhibits low shrinkage and low birefringence making it suitable for many optical applications such as optical lenses, optical fibers, prisms, light guides, optical adhesives, and optical films.
Reclamaciones  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)
Claims
1 Λn optical article comprising a cured composition comprising a) 50 to 99 parts by weight of an oligomer having a plurality of" pendent, free-radically polymeπzable functional groups and a T6 of > 2O0C, b) 1 to 50 parts by weight of a free-radically polymeπzable eroisl inking agent and/or a diluent monomer, and c) 0 001 to 5 parts by weight of a photoinitiator, based on 100 pans by weight of a) and b).
2. The optical article of claim 1 selected from the groups consisting of optical lenses, optica! fibers, prisms, diffractive lenses, microlenses, microlens arrays, Fresnel lenses, light guides, wave guides and optical films.
3. The optical article of claim I wherein said oligomer is selected from poly(meth)acryJate, polyurethane, polyepoxide, polyester, polyether, polysulfϊde, and polycarbonate oligomers.
4. A polarizing beam splitter comprising: a first prism having a first surface and at least two outer surfaces, and a second prism having a first surface and at least two outer surfaces, and an polarizing layer having a pass axis disposed between said first surfaces of the first and second polarizers, wherein at least one prism comprises a cured composition comprising a) 50 to 99 parts by weight of an oligomer having a plurality of pendent, free-radically polymerizable functional groups and a Tg of ≥ 200C; b) 1 to 50 parts by weight of a free-radically polymerizable crossl inking agent and/or a diluent monomer, and c) 0.001 to 5 parts by weight of a photoinitiator, based on 100 parts by weight of a) and b).
5. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4, wherein said polarizing layer comprises a multilayer birefringent film.
6 The polaπ/ing beam splitter ot claim 4 wherein said polarizi ng layer comprises a multi layer hircfπngcnt fi lm layer
7 The polarizing beam splitter of claim 6 wherein sard multilayer birefπngent film is adhesively bonded to the first surfaces of the first and second prisms
8. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 6 wherein said multilayer birefπngent film is integral to the first surfaces of the first and second prisms.
9. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4, wherein the birefringent film comprises a plurality of alternating first polymer layers having a high index of refraction and a plurality of second polymer layers having a lower index of refraction.
10. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 9 wherein adjacent pairs of layers of the birefringent film have a total optical thickness that is 1/2 of the wavelength of the light desired to be reflected.
1 1. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 9 wherein adjacent pairs of layers have a total optical thickness that is 1/4 of the wavelength of the light desired to be reflected.
12. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4 wherein the prisms exhibit a birefringence of less than 1x10~6.
13. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4 wherein at least one of said outer surfaces of either the first and second prisms has optical power.
14. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 13 wherein the surface having optical power comprises an integral Fresnel lens.
1 5. The polari sing beam splitter o t c laim 1 3 wherein the surface having optical power is curved.
16. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 1 5 wherein the curved surface is a convex or concave curved surface.
17. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4 wherein the first surfaces of the first and second prisms are mating curved surfaces, with the polarizing layer disposed therebetween.
18. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4, wherein one of more outer surfaces of the first and second prisms are mirrored.
19. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4 wherein the first and/or second prisms have an alignment means.
20. The optical article of claim 1 wherein said oligomer comprises polymerized monomer units comprising: a) 50 to 99 parts by weight of (meth)acryloyl monomer units homopolymerizable to a polymer having a glass transition temperature > 200C5 b) 1 to 50 parts by weight of monomer units having a pendent, free- radically polymerizable functional group c) less than 40 parts by weight of monomer units homopolymerizable to a polymer having a glass transition temperature < 2O0C, based on 100 parts by weight of a) and b)
21. A method of making the polarizing beam splitter of any of claims 4 to 19 comprising the steps of providing a first and second prisms comprising the cured oligomer composition, each prism having a first surface and at least two outer surfaces, and adhesively securing a polarizing layer between the first surfaces of the first and second prisms. 22 Λ method of making the polarizing beam splitter of any of claims 4 to I V comprising the steps of providing a prism mold, having an open first face, securing a polarizing layer to the open face to form a pmrn mold chamber, casting said chamber with the curable oligomer composition, curing the composition, and securing a second pπs>m to
5 the polarizing layer
23 The method of claim 21. wherein said second prism is adhesively secured to the polarizing layer.
I O 24. The method of claim 21 wherein said second prism is secured to the polarizing layer by providing a second prism mold having an open face secured to the first mold, then casting and curing the curable oligomer composition.
25. The polarizing beam splitter of claim 4 wherein at least one outer surface 15 comprises a diffractive element.
26. A method of making the polarizing beam splitter of any of claims 4 to 19 comprising the steps of providing a first and second prism mold, having the polarizing layer disposed therebetween, casting and curing the curable composition in said molds, to 0 produce a polarizing beam splitter having an integral polarizing layer.
Descripción  (El texto procesado por OCR puede contener errores)

OPTICAL ARTICLES FROM C URABLF. COMPOSITIONS

KIbLD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides ohgomcπc compositions containing oligomers that are readily cured to produce optical articles and coatings

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Optical materials and optical products arc useful to control the flow and intensity of light. Examples of useful optical products include optical lenses such as Fresnel lenses, prisms, optical light fibers, light pipes, optical films including totally internal reflecting films, retroreftective sheeting, and microreplicated products such as brightness enhancement films and security products. Examples of some of these products are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,542,449, 5,175,030, 5,591,527, 5,394,255, among others.

Polymeric materials have found a variety of uses in optical articles and are widely used in place of such articles made from ground glass because the former are light in weight and inexpensive to produce. Carbonate polymers, for example are characterized by excellent clarity, resistance to discoloration, high strength, and high impact resistance. However, thermal polymerization of monomers to form polymers is generally accompanied by high shrinkage during cure (e.g., from 11 to 20%) and extended curing time (e.g., from 5 to 16 hours or more). The high shrinkage levels create difficulties in the production of precision optics (such as lenses or prisms) from this material, particularly in the production of articles having larger thicknesses or large differences in thickness between the center and edges of the article. The extended cure times tie up production facilities and lead to inefficient utilization of the dies in which the articles are molded. Also, the thermal cure cycle used to polymerize the monomer consumes large amounts of energy and undesirably thermally stresses the dies.

Optical products can be prepared from high index of refraction materials, including monomers such as high index of refraction (meth)acrylate monomers, halogenated monomers, etc., and other such high index of refraction monomers that are known in the optical product art. See, e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,568,445, 4,721 ,377, 4,812,032, and

5,424,339. Some of these polymers may be advantageously injection molded, but such molding operations lead to high birefringence in the resulting article, and a subsequent annealing btep may be required Further poly(

l methacrylate) polymers tend to be moisture sensitive, and will swell on exposure to moisture or humidity, further leading to birefringence

Several disclosures are related to optical coalings, which are generally less than two mils (50 8 micrometers) thick They fail to describe if those compositions would have a desired balance of useful properties such as low polymeri7ation shrinkage, low viscosity, absence of coloration, high hardness, resistance to stress cracking, moisture or humidity sensitivity and low birefringence necessary in the production of precision optical components such as lenses, including Fresnel lenses, and prisms Additionally, they fail to teach how to obtain resms providing the desired balance of properties that are useful for providing cast precision optical articles Moreover, many of the polymeric compositions generally have too high a viscosity to be useful for optical casting purposes

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention includes a curable composition comprising an oligomer having a plurality of pendent, ethylenically unsaturated, free-radically polymenzable functional groups, and having a Tg > 2O0C (preferably having a Tg > 5O0C), a free-radically polymerizable crosslinking agent and/or a diluent monomer; and a photoinitiator. The composition, when cured, is non-yellowing., exhibits low shrinkage and low birefringence and low sensitivity to moisture, making it suitable for many optical applications including, but not limited to optical lenses, optical fibers, prisms, diffractive lenses, microlenses, microlens arrays, Fresnel lenses, light guides, and optical films and coatings. The composition is low viscosity so that it may be used as an optical adhesive and in conventional molding operations, and build molecular weight by a chain-growth addition process. Further, articles may be prepared by cast and cure processes and thereby avoid birefringence induced by injection molding processes.

Generally, curable systems containing a significant amount of solvent, monomers and reactive diluents can give rise to a significant increase in density when transformed from the uncured to the cured state causing a net shrinkage in volume. As is well known, shrinkage can cause unpredictable registration in precise molding operations such as those required in manufacture of optical elements such as lenses. Shrinkage can also create residual stress in such optical articles, which can subsequently lead to optica! defects, including high birefringence.

The present invention also provides shaped articles, including optica) articles, and a method for preparing the same comprising, in one embodiment, the steps of: ( 1 ) mixing the components to form an optical casting composition,

(2) optionally degassing the composition,

(3) optionally heating the composition,

(4) introducing the composition into a suitable mold, and

(5) effecting polymerization, preferably photopolymerizatton, of the composition. The present invention addresses the needs of the industry by providing a rapid cure, solvent free, curable composition, to produce thick precision optics such as optical lenses, light guides, prisms, etc., with low birefringence for applications in electronic displays, cameras, binoculars, fax machines, bar code scanners, and optical communication devices. The present invention is especially useful in preparing prisms such as those used in polarizing beam splitters (PB S 's) used in optical imager systems and optical reader systems. The term "optical imager system" as used herein is meant to include a wide variety of optical systems that produce an image for a viewer to view. Optical imager systems of the present invention may be used, for example, in front and rear projection systems, projection displays, head-mounted displays, virtual viewers, heads-up displays, optical computing systems, optical correlation systems, and other optical viewing and display systems.

A PBS is an optical component that splits incident light rays into a first polarization component and a second polarization component. Traditional PBS's function based on the plane of incidence of the light, that is, a plane defined by the incident light ray and a normal to the polarizing surface. The plane of incidence also is referred to as the reflection plane, defined by the reflected light ray and a normal to the reflecting surface. Based on the operation of traditional polarizers, light has been described as having two polarization components, a p and an s-component. The p-component corresponds to light polarized in the plane of incidence. The s-component corresponds to light polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence.

To achieve the maximum possible efficiency in an optical imaging system, a low f/# system is desirable (see, F.E. Doany et al., Projection display throughput; Efficiency of uptiLdl u ansitiisbiυn and light-source col lection, [ BM J Res Develop V42. May/July I WR, pp The OU measures the light gathering ability υf an optical lens and is defined as- ϊin - r (focal length) ÷ D (diameter or clear aperture of the lens). The f/# (or F) measures the size of the cone of light that may be used to illuminate an optical element.

The lower the f/#. the faster the lens and the larger the cone of light that may be used with that optical element. A larger cone of light generally translates to higher light throughput. Accordingly, a faster (lower f/#) illumination system requires a PBS able to accept light rays having a wider range of incident angles. The maximum incident angle Θmax (the outer rays of the cone of light) may be mathematically derived from the f/#;

Traditional folded light path optical imaging systems have employed an optical element know as a MacNeille polarizer. MacNeille polarizers take advantage of the fact that an angle exists, called Brewster's angle, at which no p-polarized light is reflected from an interface between two media of differing refractive index (n). Brewster's angle is given by: ΘB = tan"1 (ni/no), where no is the refractive index of one medium, and nj is the refractive index of the other. When the angle of incidence of an incident light ray reaches the Brewster angle, the reflected beam portion is polarized in the plane perpendicular to the plane of incidence.

The transmitted beam portion becomes preferentially (but not completely) polarized in the plane parallel to the plane of incidence. In order to achieve efficient reflection of s- polarized light, a MacNeille polarizer is constructed from multiple layers of thin films of materials meeting the Brewster angle condition for the desired angle. The film thicknesses are chosen such that the film layer pairs form a quarter wave stack.

There is an advantage to this construction in that the Brewster angle condition is not dependent on wavelength (except for dispersion in the materials). However, MacNeille polarizers have difficulty achieving wide-angle performance due to the fact that the Brewster angle condition for a pair of materials is strictly met at only one angle of incidence. As the angle of incidence deviates from this angle a spectrally non-uniform leak develops. This leak hecomes especially severe as the angle of incidence on the film stack becomes more normal than the Brewster's angle. As will be explained below, there are also contrast disadvantages for a folded light path projector associated with the use of p and s-polaπzatiun, referenced tυ the plane of reflection for each ray

I ypicaily, MacNeille PBS's are contained in glass cubes, wherein a PBS thin-film stack is applied along a diagonal plane of the cube By suitably selecting the index of the glass in the cube, the PBS may be constructed so that l ight incident normal to the face of the cube is incident at the Brewster angle of the PBS However, the use of cubes gives rise to certain disadvantages, principally associated with the generation of thermal stress- induced birefringence that degrades the polarization performance of the component. Even expensive pre-annealed cubes may suffer from this difficulty. Also cubes add significant weight to a compact system.

MacNeilfe-type PBS's reportedly have been developed capable of discrimination between s- and p-polarized light at f/#'s as low as f/2.5, while providing extinction levels m excess of 100: 1 between incident beams of pure s- or pure p- polarization. Unfortunately, as explained below, when MacNeille-type PBS's are used in a folded light path with reflective imagers, the contrast is degraded due to depolarization of rays of light having a reflection plane rotated relative to the reflection plane of the principal ray. As used below, the term "depolarization" is meant to describe the deviation of the polarization state of a light ray from that of the principal light ray. As light in a projection system generally is projected as a cone, most of the rays of light are not perfectly parallel to the principal light ray. The depolarization increases as the f/# decreases, and is magnified in subsequent reflections from color selective films. This "depolarization cascade" has been calculated by some optical imaging system designers to effectively limit the f/# of MacNeille PBS based projectors to about 3.3, thereby limiting the light throughput efficiency of these systems. See, A.E. Rosenbluth et al., Contrast properties of reflective liquid crystal light valves inprojection displays, IBM J. Res. Develop. V42, May/July

1998, pp. 359-386.

As used herein:

"Actinic radiation" means photochemically active radiation and particle beams. Actinic radiation includes, but is not limited to, accelerated particles, for example, electron beams; and electromagnetic radiation; for example, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet light, X-rays, and gamma-rays. The radiation can be monochromatic or polychromatic, coherent or incoherent, and should be sufficiently intense to generate substantial numbers of free radicals in the actinic radiation curable compositions used in the inventive compositions.

"(Meth)acryloyl groups" means both acryloyl and methacryloyl groups, and includes acrylatc, mcthacrylate, acrylamide and methacrylamide groups.

"Ethylenically unsaturated groups" include, but are not limited to, vinyl, (meth)acryloyl and the like.

"Melt processible" is used to refer to oligomer compositions that possess or achieve a suitable low viscosity for coating or molding at temperatures iess than or equal to 1000C, using conventional molding or coating equipment.

"Photocuring" and "photopolymerization" are used interchangeably in this application to indicate an actinic radiation induced chemical reaction in which relatively simple molecules combine to form a chain or net-like macromolecule.

" 100% solids" means a composition free of unreactive species, such as solvents. "Transmittance" of radiant energy refers to the passage of radiant energy through a material.

"Transparency" may be considered as a degree of regular transmission, and thus the property of a material by which objects may be seen through a sheet thereof. A transparent material transmits light without significant diffusion or scattering.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURE

Figures 1 and 2 are schematics of a process of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The present invention provides curable materials comprising one or more oligomers, preferably (meth)acryloyl oligomers having a plurality of pendent, free- radically polymerizable functional groups, and having a Tg > 200C (preferably a Tg > 500C); a free-radically polymerizable crosslinking agent and/or a diluent monomer, and a photoinitiator. The oligomer may be selected from poly(meth)acrylate, polyurethane, polyepoxide, polyester, polyether, polysulfϊde, and polycarbonate oligomers. In mam embodiments, the present invention provides curable materials with low shrinkage, residual stress and birefringence that is optically clear and nυn-> ellυwing for applications in precision optics and electronic displays

The composition of the present invention minimizes shrinkage and birefringence due to optimum molecular weight of the oligomer and loading of the crosslinker and/or reactive diluent The low shrinkage compositions of this invention are particularly useful in molding applications or in any applications where accurate molding and/or registration is required. The present invention provides new compositions that may be formulated as 100% solids, cured by free-radical means and that exhibit properties that meet or exceed those of the art. The present invention provides compositions that exhibit less than 5% shrinkage, and preferably less than 3%. The compositions are low in viscosity and suitable for molding processes, including precision molding processes. The compositions generally have a viscosity less than 20,000 centipoise, less than 15,000 centipoise, or less than 10,000 centipoise at application temperatures of 1000C or less. The compositions generally have a viscosity of at least 100 centipoise, or at least 500 centipoise at application temperatures of 1000C or less.

The articles of the invention may have a thickness greater than about 0.5 millimeters, generally a birefringence (absolute) of less than lxlθ~6, light transmission greater than about 85%, preferably greater than 90%, and a CIELAB b* less than about 1.5 units, preferably less than about 1.0 unit for samples with thickness of 4.8 millimeters.

The composition generally comprises:

50 to 99 parts by weight, preferably 60 to 95 parts and most preferably 70 to 95 parts of an oligomer having a plurality of pendent free-radically polymerizable functional groups and having a Tg > 200C, preferably > 500C; 1 to 50 parts by weight, preferably 5 to 40 parts, and most preferably 5 to 30 parts of a free-radically polymerizable crosslinking agent and/or a diluent monomer; and 0.001 to 5 parts be weight, preferably 0. 001 to 1, most preferably 0.01 to 0.1 parts of a photoinitiator, based on 100 parts by weight of oligomer and crosslinking agent and/or reactive diluent monomer. In some preferred embodiments, the crosslinking agent comprises 1 to 40 parts by weight, preferably 1 to 30 parts by weight, and most preferably 1 to 20 parts by weight. In some embodiments, the reae t iv e d iluent comprises less than 25 parts bv weight, pre ferabl y less than 1 5 parts by weight and most preferably less than 1 0 parts by weight The oligomer may be selected from poly(meth)acrylatc, polyurethane, polyepoxide. polyester, poly ether, poly sulfide, and polycarbonate oligomers Suitable oligomers for compositions of the invention have a glass transition temperature ( I g) oi greater than about 20 0C, preferably greater than about 500C The (meth)acryloyl- functionalized oligomers useful in the compositions can be represented by the general structure (I) below

where R1 is H o

R2 is (CH2)m , where m is 1 to 6;

H O o O y = N c O ; O C O ; O C ; or O

X is an polyvalent radical group resulting from oligomerized monomer units (i.e. the oligomer chain), such as a poly(meth)acryloyl, polyurethane, polyepoxide, polyester, polyether, polysulfide, polyepoxide, and polycarbonate; and n is greater than or equal to 2. The oligomer having a plurality of pendent or terminal, free-radically polymerizable groups is selected such tl free-radical homopolymerization of the oligomer (e.g., by photo- or thermal initiation) results ii polymer having a glass transition temperature at or above 200C, preferably at or above 50 0C.

For structure (I)5 wherein n is greater than or equal to 2, an oligomer having a plurality of pendent or terminal (meth)acryloyl groups is provided. In certain embodiments of the invention, oligomers are utilized having n such that the degree of polymerization from 10 to 300, preferably 15 to 200, more preferably 20 to 200. Preferably Formula I defines a (meth)acrylated aliphatic urethane oligomer, (meth)acrylated aliphatic polyester oligomer, ( meth)acrylated aliphatic epυx v ol igomer, (meth)acrylated aliphatic polycarbonate oligomer, or a (meth)acry lated aliphatic acrylic oligomer Methods tor making such oligomers are well known in the art, and many useful free-radically polymcri7ablc oligomers are commercially available (Meth)acrylated urethanes are multifunctional (meth)acrylate esters of hydroxy terminated isocyanate extended polyols, polyesters or polyethers (Meth)acrylated urethane oligomers can be synthesized, for example, by reacting a diisocyanate or other polyvalent isocyanate compound with a polyvalent radical polyol (including polyether and polyester polyols) to yield an isocyanate terminated urethane prepolymer. A polyester polyol can be formed by reacting a polybasic acid (e.g., terephthalic acid or maleic acid) with a polyhydric alcohol (e.g., ethylene glycol or 1 ,6-hexanediol). A polyether polyol useful for making the acrylate functionalized urethane oligomer can be chosen from, for example, polyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, poly(tetrahydrofuran), poly(2- methyl-tetrahydrofuran), poly(3-methyl-tetrahydrofuran) and the like. Alternatively, the polyol linkage of an acrylated urethane oligomer (structure (II)) can be a polycarbonate polyol.

Subsequently, (meth)acrylates having a hydroxyl group can then be reacted with the terminal isocyanate groups of the prepolymer. Both aromatic and the preferred aliphatic isocyanates can be used to react with the urethane to obtain the oligomer. Examples of diisocyanates useful for making the acrylated oligomers are 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate, 2,6-tolylene diiscyanate, 1 ,3-xyIylene diisocyanate, 1,4-xylylene diisocyanate, 1,6-hexane diisocyanate, isophorone diisocyanate and the like. Examples of hydroxy terminated acrylates useful for making the acrylated oligomers include, but are not limited to, 2-hydroxyethyl (meth)acrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl (meth)acrylate, 4- hydroxybutyl acrylate, polyethylene glycol (meth)acrylate and the like.

A (meth)acrylated urethane oligomer can be, for example, any urethane oligomer having at least two acrylate functionalities and generally less than about six functionalities. Suitable (meth)acrylated urethane oligomers are also commercially available such as, for example, those known by the trade designations PHOTOMER 6008, 6019, 6184 (aliphatic urethane triacrylates) available from Henkel Corp.; EBECRYL 220 (hexafunctional aromatic urethane acrylate of 1000 molecular weight), EBECRYL 284 (aliphatic urethane diacrylate of 1200 molecular weight diluted with 12% of 1,6- hexanediol diacrylate), EBL-XRYL 4830 (aliphatic ureihane diacrylate of 1200 molecular weight di luted with 10% ot ietra ethylene glycol diacrylate), and FiBECRYL 6602 (tπfunctional aromatic urethanc dcrylate of 1300 molecular weight diluted with 40% of tπmethylolpropane ethoxy tπacrylate), available from UCB Chemical, and SARTOMER CN 1963, 963 E75, 945 A60, 963 B80, 968, and 983) available from Sartomer Co., Exton, PA

Alternatively, the acrylate functionalized oligomers can be polyester acrylate oligomers, acrylated acrylic oligomers, polycarbonate acrylate oligomers or polyether acrylate oligomers. Suitable acrylated acrylic oligomers include, for example, commercially available products such as Ebecryl 745 and 1710 both of which are available from UCB Chemicals (Smyrna, GA). Useful polyester acrylate oligomers include CN293,

CN294, and CN2250, 2281, 2900 from Sartomer Co. (Exton, PA) and EBECRYL 80, 657, 830, and 1810 from UCB Chemicals (Smyrna, GA). Suitable polyether acrylate oligomers include CN501, 502, and 551 from Sartomer Co. (Exton, PA). Useful polycarbonate acrylate oligomers can be prepared according to US 6451958 (Sartomer Technology Company Inc., Wilmington, DE).

(Meth)acrylated epoxies are multifunctional (meth)acrylate esters of epoxy resins, such as the (meth)acrylated esters of bisphenol-A epoxy resin. Examples of commercially available acrylated epoxies include those known by the trade designations EBECRYL 600 (bisphenol A epoxy diacrylate of 525 molecular weight), EBECRYL 605 (EBECRYL 600 with 25% tripropylene glycol diacrylate), EBECRYL 3700 (bispenol A diacrylate of 524 molecular weight) and EBECRYL 3720H (bisphenol A diacrylate of 524 molecular weight with 20% hexanediol diacrylate) available from UCB Chemical, Smyrna, GA; and PHOTOMER 3016 (bisphenol A epoxy acrylate), PHOTOMER 3016-40R (epoxy acrylate and 40% tripropylene glycol diacrylate blend), and PHOTOMER 3072 (modified bisphenol A acrylate, etc.) available from Henkel Corp., Hoboken, NJ.

In a preferred embodiment, the oligomer generally comprises polymerized acryloyl monomer units comprising: a) 50 to 99 parts by weight, preferably 60 to 97 parts by weight, most preferably 80 to 95 parts by weight of (meth)acryloyl monomer units homopolymerizable to a polymer having a glass transition temperature >

200C, preferably > 500C, preferably the (meth)acryloyl monomer units are (meth)acrylate monomer units b) 1 to 50 pans by weight, preferably 3 to 40 parts by weight, most preferably 5 to 20 parts by weight, of monomer units having a pendent, free-radically polymerizable functional group. c) less than 40 parts by weight, preferably less than 30 parts by weight, most preferably less than 20 parts by weight, of monomer units homopolymerizable to a polymer having a glass transition temperature less than 2O0C, based on 100 parts by weight of a) and b).

The first component oligomer comprises one or more high Tg monomers, which if homopolymerized, yield a polymer having a Tg > 2O0C, preferably >50°C. Preferred high Tg monomers are monofunctional (meth)acrylate esters of mono- and bicyclic aliphatic alcohols having at least 6 carbon atoms, and of aromatic alcohols. Both the cycloaliphatic and aromatic groups may be substituted, for example, by C i _g alkyl, halogen, sulfur, cyano, and the like. Especially preferred high Tg monomers include 3,5- dimethyladamantyl (meth)acrylate; isobornyl (meth)acrylate; 4-biphenyl (meth)acrylate; phenyl (meth)acrylate; benzyl methacrylate; and 2-naphthyl (meth)acrylate; dicyclopentadienyl (meth)acrylate. Mixtures of high Tg monomers may also be used.

Providing the monomer can be polymerized with the rest of the monomers that comprise the (meth)acrylate monomers, any high T2 monomer including styrene, vinylesters and the like, can be used. However, the high Tg monomer is typically an aery late or methacrylate ester.

Other high Tg monomers include Ci-C20 alkyl (meth)acrylates such as methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate, isopropyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, isobutyl methacrylate, t-butyl (meth)acrylate, stearyl methacrylate, cyclohexyl methacrylate, 3,3,5- trimethylcyclohexyl methacrylate, tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate, allyl methaylacrylate, bromoethyl methacrylate; styrene; vinyl toluene; vinyl esters such as vinyl propionate, vinyl acetate, vinyl pivalate, and vinyl neononanoate; acrylamides such as N,N-dimethyl acrylamide, N,N-diethyl acrylamide, N-isopropyl acrylamide, N-octyl acrylamide, and t- butyl acrylamide, and (meth)acrylonitrile. Blends of high Tg monomers may be used. Most preferred high Tg monomers are selected from linear, branched, cyclo, • bridged cyclo aliphatic (meth)acrylates, such as isobornyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl methacrylate, 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl

- π - methcu r> late isopropyl mcthacrylate. n-buty l methacry late, isυbutyl methacrylate, t-butyl imt'th)acry late, stearyl methacrylate, and mixtures there ot, for their environmental (heat and light) stability

I he first component oligomer of the composition comprises one or more pendent groups that include free-radically polymeπzable unsaturatiυn Preferred pendent unsaturated groups include (meth)acryloyl, (meth)acryloxy, propargyl, and (meth)acrylamido Such pendent groups can be incorporated into the polymer in at least two ways. The most direct method is to include among the monomer units of ethylene di(meth)acrylate, 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA), or bisphenol-A di(meth)acrylate. Useful polyunsaturated monomers include allyl, propargyl, and crotyl (meth)acryiates, tπmethylolpropane triacrylate, pentaerythritol triacrylate, and allyl 2-acrylamido-2,2~ d ϊme thy 1 acetate.

Using the "direct method" of incorporating the pendent, free-radically polymerizable functional group, useful functional monomers include those unsaturated aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, and aromatic compounds having up to about 36 carbon atoms that include a functional group capable of free radical addition such as those groups containing a carbon-carbon double bond including vinyl, vinyloxy, (meth)acrylate, (meth)acryiamido, and acetylenic functional groups.

Examples of polyethylenically unsaturated monomers that can be used include, but are not limited to, polyacrylic-functional monomers such as ethylene glycol diacrylate, propylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylolpropane triacrylate, 1 ,6- hexamethylenedioldiacrylate, pentaerythritol di-, tri-, and tetraacrylate, and 1,12- dodecanedioldiacrylate; olefinic-acrylic-ftinctional monomers such as allyl methacrylate, 2-allyloxycarbonylamidoethyl methacrylate, and 2-allylaminoethyl acrylate; allyl 2- acrylamido-2,2-dimethylacetate; divinylbenzene; vinyloxy group-substituted functional monomers such as 2-(ethenyloxy)ethyl (meth)acrylate, 3-(ethynyloxy)-l-propene, 4- (ethynyloxy)-l-butene, and 4-(ethenyIoxy)butyl-2-acrylamido-2,2-dimethylacetate, and the like. Useful polyunsaturated monomers, and useful reactive/co-reactive compounds that may be used to prepare a polymer having pendent unsaturation are described in greater detail in U.S. 5,741 ,543 (Winslow et al.).

Preferred polyunsaturated monomers are those where the unsaturated groups are of unequal reactivity. Those skilled in the art recognize that the particular moieties attached to the unsaturated groups affect the relative reactivities of those unsaturated groups. For example, where a polyunsaturated monomer having unsaturated groups of equal reactivity (e.g.. HDDA) is used, premature gellation of the composition must be guarded against by, for example, the presence of oxygen, which acts as a radical scavenger. Conversely, where a polyunsaturated monomer having unsaturated groups of differing reactivities is used, the more reactive group (such as (meth)acrylate as (meth)acrylamido) preferentially is incorporated into the polymer backbone before the less reactive unsaturated group (such as vinyl, ally I, vinyloxy, or acetylenic) reacts to crosslink the composition. The direct method is generally not preferred due to difficulty in control of branching and premature gellation. An indirect, but preferred, method of incorporating pendent groups that comprise polymerizable unsaturation into the first polymer is to include among the monomer units of the polymer some that comprise a reactive functional group. Useful reactive functional groups include, but are not limited to, hydroxyl, amino (especially secondary amino), oxazolonyl, oxazolinyl, acetoacetyl, carboxyl, isocyanato, epoxy, aziridinyl, acyl halide, and cyclic anhydride groups. Preferred among these are carboxyl, hydroxyl and aziridinyl groups. These pendent reactive functional groups are reacted with unsaturated compounds that comprise functional groups that are co-reactive with the reactive pendent functional group. When the two functional groups react, an oligomer with pendent unsaturation results. Using the "indirect method" of incorporating the pendent, free-radically polymerizable functional groups, useful reactive functional groups include hydroxyl, secondary amino, oxazolinyl, oxazolonyl, acetyl, acetonyl, carboxyl, isocyanato, epoxy, aziridinyl, acyl halide, vinyloxy, and cyclic anhydride groups. Where the pendent reactive functional group is an isocyanato functional group, the co-reactive functional group preferably comprises a secondary amino or hydroxyl group. Where the pendent reactive functional group comprises a hydroxyl group, the co-reactive functional group preferably comprises a carboxyl, isocyanato, epoxy, anhydride, or oxazolinyl group. Where the pendent reactive functional group comprises a carboxyl group, the co-reactive functional group preferably comprises a hydroxyl, amino, epoxy, isocyanate, or oxazolinyl group. Most generally, the reaction is between nucleophilic and electrophilic functional groups that react by a displacement or condensation mechanism. Representative examples of useful co-reactive compounds incl ude hydroxyalkyl ( meth)acrylates such as 2-hydroxyethyl (meth)acr>'late. 4-hydrυxybutyl (meth)acrylate, and 2-(2-hydroxyetho.\y)ethyl (meth)acrylate; aminoalkyl (meth)aerylates such as 3- aminopropyl (meth)acrylatc and 4-aminostyrenc; oxazolinyl compounds such as 2- ethenyl- 1 ,3-oxazolin-5-one and 2-propenyl-4,4-dimethyl- l ,3-oxazolin-5-one; carboxy- substituted compounds such as (meth)acrylic acid and 4-carboxybenzyi (meth)acrylate; isocyanato-substituted compounds such as isocyanatoethyl (meth)aerylate and 4- isocyanatocyclohexyl (meth)acryLate; epoxy-substituted compounds such as glycidyl (meth)acrylate; aziridinyl-substituted compounds such as N-acryloylaziridine and l -(2- propenyl)-aziridine; and acryloyi halides such as (meth)acryloyl chloride.

Preferred functional monomers have the general formula

CH2=CR2A

A' wherein R1 is hydrogen, a C| to C4 alkyl group, or a phenyl group, preferably hydrogen or a methyl group; R2 is a single bond or a divalent Unking group that joins an ethylenically unsaturated group to polymerizable or reactive functional group A and preferably contains up to 34, preferably up to 18, more preferably up to 10, carbon and, optionally, oxygen and nitrogen atoms and, when R2 is not a single bond, is preferably selected from

O O — R3— > COR3 > and — CNHR3

wherein R3 is an alkylene group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, a 5- or 6-membered cycloalkylene group having 5 to 10 carbon atoms, or an alkylene-oxyalkylene in which each alkylene includes 1 to 6 carbon atoms or is a divalent aromatic group having 6 to 16 carbon atoms; and A is a functional group, capable of free-radical addition to carbon- carbon double bonds, or a reactive functional group capable of reacting with a co-reactive functional group for the incorporation of a free-radically polymerizable functional group. It will be understood, in the context of the above description of the first component oligomer, that the ethylenically-unsaturated monomer possessing a free-radically polymerizable group is chosen such that it is free-radically polymerizable with the crosslinking agent and reactive diluent. The reactions between functional groups provide a crosslink by forming a covalent bond by free-radical addition reactions of ethylenically- unsaturated groups between components In the present invention the pendent Functional groups react by an additiυn reaUiυn in which no by-product molecules are created, and the exempl i Tied reaction partners react by this preferred mode

Where the curable composition is to be processed using high temperatures and the direct method of including pendent unsaturation has been used, care must be taken not to activate those pendent groups and cause premature gelation For example, hot-melt processing temperatures can be kept relatively low and polymerization inhibitors can be added to the mixture Accordingly, where heat is to be used to process the composition, the above-described indirect method is the preferred way of incorporating the pendent unsaturated groups

The oligomer may optionally further comprise lower Tg alkyl (meth)acrylate esters or amides that may be homopolymerized to polymers having a Tg of less than 2O0C. Alkyl (meth)acrylate ester monomers useful in the invention include straight-chain, cyclic, and branched-chain isomers of alkyl esters containing Ci — C2o alkyl groups Due to Tg and side chain crystallinity considerations, preferred lower Tg alkyl (meth)acrylate esters are those having from Ci - C8 alkyl groups. Useful specific examples of alkyl (meth)acrylate esters include: methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, n-propyl acrylate, butyl acrylate, iso-amyl (meth)acrylate, n-hexyl (meth)acrylate, n-heptyl (meth)acrylate, n-octyl (meth)acrylate, iso-octyl (meth)acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl (meth)acrylate, iso-nonyl (meth)acrylate, and decyl (meth)acrylate. Most preferred (meth)acrylate esters include methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, butyl acrylate, isooctyl (meth)acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl acrylate. The lower Tg alkyl (meth)acrylate esters are added in such an amount such that the resulting oligomer has a Tgof 200C or greater. In general, such low Tg monomers are used in amounts of 40 parts by weight or less, preferably 30 parts by weight or less, most preferable 20 parts by weight or less.

The theoretical Tg of an oligomer may be calculated, for example, using the Fox equation, 1/Tg=(W1 /Tg' + w2 /Tg 2), where w1 and w2 refer to the weight fraction of the two components and Tg' and Tg 2 refer to the glass transition temperature of the two components, as described for example in L. H. Sperling, "Introduction to Physical Polymer Science", 2 nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, New York, p. 357 (1992) and T. G. Fox, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc, I5 123 (1956). Using the Tg of the component monomers, and an estimate of the weight fractions thereof in the oligomer, one may calculate the Tg of the resulting ol igomer As understood by one skilled in the art, the Fox equation may be used for a system with more than two components.

The oligomer may be prepared using radical polymerization techniques by combining an initiator and monomers in the presence of a chain transfer agent. In this reaction, a chain transfer agent transfers the active site on one growing chain to another molecule that can then start a new chain so the degree of polymerization may be controlled. The degree of polymerization of the resulting oligomer may be 10 to 300, preferably 15 to 200, more preferably 20 to 200. It has been found if the degree of polymerization is too high, the composition is too high in viscosity, and not easily melt processible, and. Conversely, if the degree of polymerization is too low, the shrinkage of the cured composition is excessive and leads to high birefringence in the cured composition.

Chain transfer agents may be used when polymerizing the monomers described herein to control the molecular weight of the resulting oligomer. Suitable chain transfer agents include halogenated hydrocarbons (e.g., carbon tetrabromide) and sulfur compounds (e.g., lauryl mercaptan, butyl mercaptan, ethanethiol, and 2-mercaptoethyl ether, isooctyl thioglycolate, t-dodecylmercaptan, 3-mercapto- 1,2 -propanediol). The amount of chain transfer agent that is useful depends upon the desired molecular weight of the oligomer and the type of chain transfer agent. The chain transfer agent is typically used in amounts from about 0.1 parts to about 10 parts; preferably 0.1 to about 8 parts; and more preferably from about 0.5 parts to about 6 parts based on total weight of the monomers.

Suitable initiators for this oligomerization reaction include, for example, thermal and photo initiators. Useful thermal initiators include azo compounds and peroxides. Examples of useful azo compounds include 2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethylpentanenitrile), (Vazo

52, commercially available from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.); 2,2'- azobis(isobutyronitrile), (Vazo 64, commercially available from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.); 2,2'-azobis(2-methylbutyronitrile), (Vazo 67, commercially available from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.); l,l '-azobis(cyanocyclohexane), (Vazo 88, commercially available from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.); l,r-azobis(l-cyclohexane-l-carbonitrile), (V-40, commercially available from Wako Pure Chemical Industries, Ltd.); and dimethyl 2,2'-azobis(isobutyrate), (V-601, commercially available from Wako Pure Chemical Industries. Ltd. ). Examples of useful peroxides include benzoyl peroxide; di -t-amyl peroxide, t-butyl peroxy benzoate. 2.5-dimethyl-2,5 Di-(t-butylperoxy)hexane, 2,5- dimethyl-2.5-Di-(t-butylperoxy)hexyne-3. lauroyl peroxide, and t-butyl peroxy pivalate Useful organic hydroperoxides include but are not limited to compounds such as t-amyl hydroperoxide and t-butyl hydroperoxide.

Useful phυtoinitiators include benzoin ethers such as benzoin methyl ether and benzoin butyl ether; acetophenone derivatives such as 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenyl- acetophenone and 2,2-diethoxy acetophenone; and acylphosphine oxide derivatives and acylphυsphonate derivatives such as diphenyl-2,4,6~trimethylbenzoylphosphine oxide, isopropoxy(phenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphosphine oxide, and dimethyl pivaloylphosphonate. Of these, 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone is preferred. The initiator is typically used at a level of 0.001 to 5 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight monomer(s).

The composition further comprises a crosslinking agent having a plurality of pendent, ethylenically unsaturated, free-radically polymerizable functional groups. Useful crosslinking agents have an average functionality (average number of ethylenically unsaturated, free-radically polymerizable functional groups per molecule) of greater than one, and preferably greater than or equal to two. The functional groups are chosen to be copolymerizable with the pendent ethylenically unsaturated, free-radically polymerizable functional groups on the first component oligomer. Useful functional groups include those described for the first component oligomer and include, but are not limited to vinyl, vinyloxy, (meth)acryloyl and acetylenic functional groups.

Useful crosslinking. agents have the general formula:

R-(Z)n where Z is a free-radically polymerizable functional group such as a carbon-carbon double bond, n is greater than 1 and R is an organic radical having a valency of n. Preferably R is an aliphatic alkyl radical of valency n which may be linear or branched.

Examples of such crosslinking agents include: C2-C1S alkylenediol di(meth)acrylates, C3-Ci8 alkylenetriol tri(meth)acrylates, such as 1 ,6-hexanediol di(meth)acrylate, trimethylolpropane tri(meth)acrylate, propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate such as CD501 from Sratomer Co., Exton, PA5 triethyleneglycol di(meth)aGrylate, pentaeritritol tri(meth)acrylate, and tripropyleneglycol di(meth)acrylate, and di-trimethylolprυpane tetradcr\ late, pυh alky leneglycol dimethacrylate such as BisomerI M EP l OODMA from Cognis Co For ease of mixing, the preferred crosshnkmg agent is not a solid material at application temperatures.

The composition according to the invention may comprise at least one reactive diluent The reactive diluents can be used to adjust the viscosity of the composition Thus, the reactive diluents can each be a low viscosity monomer containing at least one functional group capable of polymerization when exposed to actinic radiation. For example, vinyl reactive diluents and (meth)acrylate monomer diluents may be used.

The functional group present on the reactive diluents may be the same as that used in the curable (meth)acrylate oligomer. Preferably, the radiation-curable functional group present in the reactive diluent is capable of copolymerizing with the radiation-curable functional group present on the radiation-curable oligomer. The reactive diluents generally have a molecular weight of not more than about 550 or a viscosity at room temperature of less than about 500 mPascal.sec (measured as 100% diluent). The reactive diluent may comprise monomers having a (meth)acryloyl or vinyl functionality and a Ci-C2O alkyl moiety. Examples of such reactive diluents are ethyl (meth)acrylate, isopropyl (meth)acrylate, t-butyl (meth)acrylate, n-butyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl (meth)acrylate, isobomyl (meth)acrylate, isooctyl (meth)acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl (meth)acrylate, stearyl (meth)acrylate, phenoxyethyl (meth)acrylate, benzyl (meth)acrylate and the like. Low volatile alkyl (meth)acrylates such as isobornyl (meth)acrylate, 2- ethylhexyl (meth)acrylate, cyclohexyl (meth)acrylate, isooctyl (meth)acrylate, stearyl (meth)acrylate, phenoxyethyl (meth)acrylate, benzyl (meth)acrylate are preferred reactive diluents.

The reactive diluent is preferably added in such an amount that the shrinkage of the cured compositions does not exceed around 5%, preferably not above around 3%, as measured by the test method described herein. Suitable amounts of the reactive diluents have been found to be less than about 25 parts by weight, preferably about 0 to about 15 parts by weight, and more preferably about 0 to about 10 parts by weight. Preferably, the sum of the amounts of the reactive diluent and the crosslinking agent is less than 40 parts by weight.

The components of the composition may be combined and cured with a photoinitiator. The photoinitiator improves the rate of cure and percent conversion of the curable compositions, but the depth of cure (υf thicker coatings or shaped articles) may be deleteπously affected as the photoinittator may attenuate the transmitted light that penetrates the thickness of the sample. The photoinitiator is used in an amount of less than 1 .0 weight %, preferably less than 0 1 weight %, most preferably less than 0.05 weight % Conventional photoinitiators can be used. Examples include benzophenones, acetophenone derivatives, such as α-hydroxyalkylphcnylketones, benzoin alkyl ethers and benzil ketals, monoacylphosphine oxides, and bis-acylphosphine oxides. Preferred photoinitiators are ethyl 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoylphenyl phosphinate (Lucirin TPO-L) available from BASF, Mt. Olive, NJ, 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-l-phenyl-propan- l -one (IRGACURE I 173™, Ciba Specialties), 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenyl acetophenone

(IRGACURE 651™, Ciba Specialties), phenyl bis(2,4,6-trimethyl benzoyl) phosphine oxide (IRGACURE 819, Ciba Specialities). Other suitable photoinitiators include mercaptobenzothiazoles, mercaptobenzooxazoles and hexaryl bisimidazole. Often, mixtures of photoinitiators provide a suitable balance of properties. The compositions can then be applied to the desired substrate or added to a mold and exposed to actinic radiation such as UV light. The composition may be exposed to any form of actinic radiation, such as visible light or UV radiation, but is preferably exposed to UVA (320 to 390 run) or UVB (395 to 445 nm) radiation. Generally, the amount of actinic radiation should be sufficient to form a non-tacky, dimensionally stable solid mass. Generally, the amount of energy required for curing the compositions of the invention ranges from about 0.2 to 20.0 J/cm2.

The photopolymerization may be effected by any suitable light source including carbon arc lights, low, medium, or high pressure mercury vapor lamps, swirl-flow plasma arc lamps, xenon flash lamps, ultraviolet light emitting diodes, and ultraviolet light emitting lasers For many applications it may be desirable to use an LED light source or array to effect the curing. Such LED sources may effect a faster cure and provide less heat to the composition during cure. One suitable LED source is the Norlux large area array, series 808 (available from Norlux, Carol Stream, IL).

A preferred method of making the oligomer is through an adiabatic polymerization method (see for example, U.S. 5,986,011 (Ellis) or U.S. 5,753,768 (Ellis)). In such a polymerization, the polymerization initiator(s) may be used at a low level, to reduce color due to the initiator fragments incorporated into the polymer. Further, during an adiabatic poK meπzation, partly because of low initiarnr levels, and partly due to the increasing temperature profile that accompanies polymerization, conditions can be selected such that the initiator is essentially completely consumed during the polymerization or at the end of the polymerization. Having all thermal polymerization initiator consumed advantageously prevents or reduces unwanted polymerization and crosslinking during the functionalization step ot the oligomer using the '"indirect method" of incorporating the pendent, free- radically polymeπzable functional groups (described herein) Further, having no significant traces of thermal initiator present beneficially improve the stability of the functionalizcd oligomer during storage and transport, prior to molding and further curing The adiabatic polymerization process comprises the steps of:

(a) providing the oligomer composition of the invention in a batch reactor;

(b) deoxygenating the mixture, wherein step (b) can optionally at least partially overlap with step (c);

(c) heating the mixture to a sufficient temperature to generate sufficient initiator free radicals from at least one thermal free radical initiator so as to initiate polymerization;

(d) allowing the mixture to polymerize under essentially adiabatic conditions to yield an at least partially polymerized mixture;

(e) optionally heating the mixture to generate free radicals from some or all of any initiator that has not generated initiator free radicals, followed by allowing the mixture to polymerize under essentially adiabatic conditions to yield a further polymerized mixture; and

(f) optionally repeating step (e) one or more times.

(g) optionally repeating steps (a) to (e) one or more times with cooling between repeats. Step (g) is useful if the monomers have a heat of reaction such that it is difficult to achieve the desired conversion to oligomer in one adiabatic polymerization step without getting too hot. Multiple repeats of steps (a) to (e) with cooling between repeats to the proper temperature(s) and then polymerizing adiabatically further in the one or more repeats can be beneficial to control the final polymerization temperature to a desired level. This may prevent yellowing due to polymer degradation as result of the heat of polymerization. By appropriately selecting initiator(s) and amounts in step (a) and optional use of step (g), the conversion to polymer can be advantageously controlled to be sufficiently high so as to provide curable materials with low shrinkage, residual stress and birefringence Further, in some instances, the

and addition oi reactive diluents can then be performed while in the same reaction equipment minimizing contamination and υxidaliυn υf the final curable formulation

1 he composition and process for making optical products of the present invention 5 are applicable to a variety ot applications needing optical elements including, for example, optical lenses such as Fresnel lenses, prisms, optical films, such as high index of refraction films, non-warpmg and low birefringence film e g , microreplicated films such as totally internal reflecting films, or brightness enhancing films, flat films, multilayer films, retroreflective sheeting, optical light fibers or tubes, and others. Such optical products are

I O useful in optical assemblies, optical projection systems, such as projection televisions, as well as displays and other devices containing the optical assemblies The optical products of this invention include articles that are currently prepared from ground glass, or injection molded plastic.

Such articles may have a thickness of about 0.5 mm or greater, and can be prepared

15 from a curable composition of this invention which is made by mixing in a suitable vessel, in any convenient order, the oligomer, crosslinking agent and/or reactive diluent, and a photoinitiator. Mixing is continued until the components of the composition are in a single phase. Thicknesses of 25 mm articles have been achieved using the composition and curing process of this invention. 0 At the time of use, the composition is preferably degassed using a vacuum of less than about 25 Torr or by flowing the composition in a thin film past a suitable boundary. The degassed composition is introduced, optionally using a pressure of about 2 to 400

Kg/cm^, into a mold corresponding to the shape of the article that is desired to be prepared. Such molds are generally made of plastic, glass or metal, or combinations 5 thereof.

In one embodiment, the curable composition may be applied to the surface of the mold having the requisite shape or to mold elements corresponding to the desired optical article, such as a lens. The volume of curable composition that enters the mold or mold elements can be controlled by sliding a squeegee across the surface of the mold. The 0 amount of curable composition can also be applied by other known coating techniques, such as by the use of a roller. If desired, heating may be used to reduce the viscosity of the composition and provide more efficient molding. As described, many embodiments of the invention are meli-processlble, i e possess or achieve a suitable low viscosi ty for coating υr molding at temperatures less than or equal to 1000C

1 he mold elements may be completely filled or may be partially filled If the photopolymeri7able composition is a 100% solids, non-shrinking, curable material, then the shape of the cured composition will remain the same as that ot the mold elements

However, if the photopolymeπzable composition shrinks as it hardens, then the liquid will contract, creating unreliable registration, and introducing optical defects Preferably, the photopolymeπzable composition includes materials that shrink by less than about 5% by volume, and preferably less than about 3%, during curing. To initiate photopolymeπzation, the molds are filled, placed under a source of actinic radiation such as a high-energy ultraviolet source having a duration and intensity of such exposure to provide for essentially complete (greater than 80%) polymerization of the composition contained in the molds. If desired, filters may be employed to exclude wavelengths that may deleteriously affect the reactive components or the photopolymerization. Photopolymerization may be effected via an exposed surface of the curable composition, or "through-mold" by appropriate selection of a mold material having the requisite transmission at the wavelengths necessary to effect polymerization.

Photoinitiation energy sources emit actinic radiation, i.e., radiation having a wavelength of 700 nanometers or less which is capable of producing, either directly or indirectly, free radicals capable of initiating addition polymerization and chain-growth polymerization of the optical casting resins of this invention. Preferred photoinitiation energy sources emit ultraviolet radiation, i.e., radiation having a wavelength between about 180 and 460 nanometers, including photoinitiation energy sources such as carbon arc lights, low, medium, or high pressure mercury vapor lamps, swirl-flow plasma arc lamps, xenon flash lamps, ultraviolet light emitting diodes, and ultraviolet light emitting lasers. Particularly preferred ultraviolet light sources are xenon flash lamps available from Xenon Corp, Wilburn, MA, such as models RC-600, RC-700 and RC-747 pulsed UV- Vis curing systems and LED sources such as Norlux Series 808 large area array, (available from Norlux, Carol Stream, IL). Although not preferred, the curable composition may also use convention thermal initiators, previously described.

In some embodiments, the optical product can contain one or more features, such as flat or curved surfaces (including convex and concave surfaces), or replicated or microreplicatcd surfaces (such as Fresnel lenses), either of which can he derived from the composition of the invention and a suitable mold. Structure-bearing articles can be constructed in a variety υf forms, including those including plurality of linear prismatic structures having a series of alternating tips and grooves. An example of such a film is BEF. having regular repeating pattern of symmetrical tips and grooves. Other examples include patterns in which the tips and grooves are not symmetrical and in which the size, orientation, or distance between the tips and grooves is not uniform. Several examples of surface structure bearing articles useful as brightness enhancing films are described in U.S. 5, 175,030, (Lu et al.) and U.S. 5, 183,597, (Lu). According to the descriptions of Lu and Lu et al., a structure-bearing optical product can be prepared by a method including the steps of (a) preparing a polymerizable composition; (b) depositing the polymerizable composition onto a master negative microstructured molding surface in an amount barely sufficient to fill the cavities of the master; (c) filling the cavities by moving a bead of the polymerizable composition between a preformed base and the master, at least one of which is flexible; and (d) curing the composition. The master can be metallic, such as nickel, nickel-plated copper or brass, or can be a thermoplastic material that is stable under the polymerization conditions, and that preferably has a surface energy that allows clean removal of the polymerized material from the master. In a preferred embodiment, the optical article comprises a polarizing beam splitter, wherein incident light is split into first and second substantially polarized beam states that may be used in an image display system. As shown in Figure I5 the beam splitter comprises a first prism (60a), a second prism (60b) and a polarizing layer having a pass axis disposed therebetween (20). At least one prism comprises the instant cured composition. Each of the prisms has a first surface coincident with the polarizing layer, and two or more outer surfaces. As used herein, the term "prism" refers to an optical element that controls the angular transmission of incident light through the polarizing layer, and the angular character of light exiting the article. The prisms may be regular polygons, such as triangular prisms, or may have one or more features that confer optical power to the article, such as curved faces, or microreplicated features, such as microlenses

(and arrays thereof) or Fresnel lenses. Further, the prisms may further comprise mirrored elements, such as a vapor deposited metal coating on or more surfaces. Combinations of these elements arc also contemplated, for example a curved surface additionally having a diffract ive clement, such as a microlens or microlens array, or a curved surtace having a mirror element

Although depicted as including two triangular prisms (see 1- igures 1 and 2), the prisms may be any suitable shape disposed on one or both sides of the polarizing layer to achieve the desired purpose of the PBS. In some embodiments, one or more of the outer surfaces of the first and second prisms, i.e. one of the surfaces not adjacent the polarizing layer, may be curved, either convex or concave, or may comprise a structured surface, such as a Fresnel lens surface. Such curved surfaces provide optical power to the polarizing beam splitter; i.e., they converge or diverge fight passing therethrough. The degree to which a lens or mirror converges or diverges light usually is equal to the reciprocal of the focal length of the device.

Further, one or more of the first surfaces (i.e. the surface adjacent to the polarizing layer) may be curved or microreplicated. For example, a first prism may have a convex first surface, and a second prism may have a mating concave first surface, with a polarizing layer disposed therebetween. Further, one or more of the outer surfaces of the first and second prisms, (i.e. one of the surfaces not adjacent the polarizing layer), may be fully or partially reflective; i.e. comprises a vapor-deposited metal coating.

Reflective polarizing layers in exemplary PBS 's constructed according to the present disclosure include linear reflective polarizers having a pass axis. In one embodiment, the polarizing layer may be a wire grid polarizer, such as those described in Schnabel et al., "Study on Polarizing Visible Light by Sub wavelength-Period Metal-Stripe Gratings", Optical Engineering 38(2), pp. 220-226, February 1999, relevant portions of which are hereby included by reference. A wire grid polarizer consists of an array of very fine parallel lines or ribbons of metal coated on glass or other transparent substrates. The wire array efficiently polarizes the incident light when the width and spacing are small compared to the incident wavelength(s). Common metals for the wire grid array include gold, silver, and aluminum among others known in the art.

In one embodiment the polarizing beam splitter may comprise a first prism having a first surface and at least two outer surfaces, a second prism having a first surface and least two outer surfaces, and a wire grid polarizer disposed between the first surfaces of the first and second prisms. Preferably, a wire grid polarizer comprising a substrate, such as glass, is bonded to the first surfaces by means of an optical adhesive Less preferably , the wire grid is deposited such as by vapor deposition techniques, on one ot said first surfaces, and the second pmm bonded thereto

Wire-gπd polarizers absorb small portions of the received light This generates heat in the substrates and is therefore not preferred For example, 5- 10% of the light is absorbed by aluminum stripes in the same manner as an aluminum mirror surface Since the performance of the wire-gπd polarizer is sensitive to the geometric stability of the metal stripes, a small change in the substrates due to thermal expansion can degrade the polarizer's performance In another embodiment, the polarizing layer may comprise alternating repeating layers of a pair of inorganic thin film materials deposited on the first surface of one or both prisms. The pair of thin film materials comprises one low refractive index material and one high refractive index material. The indices, called a MacNeille pair, are chosen such that, for a given angle of incidence of a light beam, the reflection coefficient for p- polarized light (rd is essentially zero at each thin film interface. The angle at which rp is zero is called the Brewster angle, and the formula relating the Brewster angle to the numerical values of the indices is called the MacNeille condition. The reflection coefficient for s-polarized light (rs ) is non-zero at each thin film interface. Therefore, as more thin film layers are added, the total reflectivity for s-polarized light increases while the reflectivity for p-polarized light remains essentially zero. Thus, an unpolarized beam of light, incident upon the thin film stack, has some or all of the s-polarized components reflected while essentially all of the p-polarized component is transmitted.

In one embodiment, the repeating layers of a pair of inorganic thin film materials (the optical stack) is deposited on the first surface of a prism and the bonded to the first surface of a second prism, such as with an optical adhesive to form a polarizing beam splitter. The polarizing beam splitter comprises at least one set of pairs of alternating layers of materials having low and high indices of refraction compared to each other. The thicknesses of the layers are chosen such that the quarterwave criterion is met for the wavelength of the incident collimated light beam by each of layers of low and high refractive index material. The optical properties of the prism material, and the properties of the composite optical stack, all combine to divide the incident light beam into two polarization components. Suitable material s for the thin fi lms include any materials that are transparent (exhibit low absorption ) in the spectrum of interest For broadband visi ble light, suitable thin film materials are si licon dioxide ( n-1 45 ), amorphous hydrogenaled bil itυn nitride (n= 1 68-2 0), titanium dioxide (n=2 2-2 5) , magnesium fluoride) (n= l 18), cryolite (NajΛlF6, n=l 35), zinc sulphide (n=2 1 -2 4), zirconium oxide (n=2.05) ; hafnium oxide

(n-2 0) , and aluminum nitride (n=2 2)

Several thin Film deposition techniques can be used to deposit the composite optical stack on the prisms, including thermal and electron beam evaporation, and ion beam sputtering and magnetron sputtering However, thermal and electron beam evaporation should provide good thin film qualities and sufficiently high deposition rates for acceptable manufacturing rates. More importantly, low index films such as magnesium fluoride and cryolite can be deposited by this method. Electron beam deposition is regularly used in the coatings industry for high index materials such as titanium dioxide, zirconium oxide, hafnium oxide, and aluminum nitride. Preferably, the polarizing layer may be a multilayer optical film. Examples of reflective polarizing films suitable for use as polarizing film in the embodiments of the present disclosure include reflective polarizers including a birefringent material, manufactured by 3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN, such as those described in U.S. 5,882,774, (Jonza et a!.); U.S. 6,609,795 (Weber et al.); and U.S. 6,719,426 (Magarill et al.). Suitable reflective polarizing films for polarizing film 20 also include polymeric reflective polarizing films that include multiple layers of different polymeric materials. For example, polarizing film may include a first layer and a second layer, where the polymeric materials of the first and second layer are different and at least one of the first and second layers is birefringent. In one embodiment of the present disclosure, the polarizing film may include a multi-layer stack of first and second alternating layers of different polymer materials, as disclosed in U.S. 6,609,795 (Weber et al.). Other materials suitable for making multilayer reflective polarizers are listed, for example in Jonza et al., U.S. Patent No. 5,882,774; Weber et al., U.S. Patent No. 6,609,795. In another embodiment of the present disclosure, multiple reflective polarizing films may be used. Suitable reflective polarizing films are typically characterized by a large refractive index difference between first and second polymeric materials along a first direction in the plane of the film and a small refractive index difference between first and second polymeric materials along a second direction in the plane of the film, orthogonal to the first direction In some exemplar) embodiments, reflective polarizing films are also characterized by a small refractiv e index di fference between the first and second polymeric materials along the thickness direction of the film (e g , between the first and second layers of different polymeric materials) Examples of suitable refractive index differences between the first and second polymeric materials in the stretched direction (i e , x-direction) range from about 0 15 to about 0 20 The refractive indices in the non- stretched directions (i e , the y-direction and the z-direction) are desirably within about 5% of one another for a given material or layer, and within about 5% of the corresponding non-stretched directions of a different material or an adjacent layer

The polymeric materials selected for the layers of an exemplary multilayer polarizing film may include materials that exhibit low levels of light absorption. For example, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) exhibits an absorption coefficient of less than I OxIO"5 centimeter"1. Accordingly, for a reflective polarizer film that includes PET and has a thickness of about 125 micrometers, the calculated absorption is about 0.000023%, which is about 1/200,000 of an absorption of a comparable wire-grid polarizer.

Low absorptions are desirable because polarizers used in PBS 's are exposed to very high light density, which can lead to the failure of the polarizers. For example, absorptive-type polarizer films absorb all the light with unwanted polarization. This generates significant heat. Substrates with high thermal conductivity, such as sapphire, are therefore needed to conduct the heat away from the polarizer films. Moreover, the substrates are exposed to high heat loads, which correspondingly generate thermal birefringence in the substrates. Thermal birefringence in the substrates degrades the contrast and contrast uniformity of the optical system, such as an image display system. As a result, only few materials can be qualified for the substrates with traditional PBS's

(e.g., sapphire, quartz, leads content glass, and ceramics).

The present invention provides a multilayer article comprising a multilayer optical film and a cured optical coating on one or both major surfaces of the optical film. Providing such a coating protects the multilayer optical film from environmental stresses and adds strength and rigidity thereto. The multilayer article may be prepared by providing a multilayer optical film, coating at least one major surface of the multilayer optical film with the curable composition, and curing. In another embodiment, separately prepared fi lms comprising the cured composition ma> be adhered to one or both ma|θr surfaces of the multilayer optical film bs means o t an optical adhesive, described further herein

I he present invention provides a method υt making a polarizing beam splitter The method comprises introducing the curable composition into a suitable mold, and curing the composition to form a prism The mold may be of any suitable configuration, one or more surfaces of which may be curved The polarizing layer may then be bonded, adhered, or otherwise affixed to the resulting pπsm(s) by any optical adhesive, such as known in the art In one embodiment, a first prism may be bonded to a first surface of the polarizing layer, the second prism bonded sequentially to the exposed surface of the polarizing layer

In another embodiment, the first and second prisms are concurrently bonded to opposite surfaces of the polarizing layer

Useful optical adhesives are substantially free of UV-absorbing chromophores such as extended aromatic structures or conjugated double bonds. Useful adhesives include, for example: NOA61 , a UV cured thiol-ene based adhesive available from the

Norland Company (Cranbury, N J ); Loctite series (e g , 3492, 3175) UV cured acrylic adhesives available from Henkel Loctite Corp , Rocky Hill, Conn.; OP series (e.g., 21 , 4- 20632, 54, 44) UV cured acrylic adhesives available from Dymax Corporation, Torrington, Conn. One useful adhesive include those compositions described in U.S. Published

Appln. No. 20040202879 (Xia et al.), which comprise at least one polymer with either an acid or base functionality that forms a pressure sensitive adhesive, a high Tg polymer with an weight average molecular weight greater than 100,000 with an acid or base functionality, and a crosslinker, wherein the functionality on the pressure sensitive adhesive and the high Tg polymer cause an acid-base interaction that forms a compatibilized blend. After accelerated aging of the adhesive composition at 8O0C and 90% relative humidity for approximately 500 hours in an oven, the adhesive mixture is translucent or optically clear.

Another useful adhesive includes microstructured adhesive, which comprise a continuous layer of a pressure-sensitive adhesive having a microstructured surface, wherein the microstructured surface comprises a series of features and wherein the lateral aspect ratio of the features range from about 0. 1 to about 10, wherein the spacing aspect ratio ot the features range from about i to about ! 9, and w herein each feature has a height υt about 2 5 to about 375 micrometers Such adhesives are described in U S Patent Nos 5,650,2 15, 6, 123,890, 6,3 15,85 1 . 6,440,880 and 6.838, 150 (each Benson et d) )

Other useful adhesives include SokenrM 1 885 PSA (commercially available from Sυken Chemical & Engineering Co , Ltd, Japan), NEA PSA (<u> described in the Example

1 υf published U S 20040202879 (Lu et al )), Lens Bond™ Type C59 (a thermally cured styrene based adhesive available from Summers Optical, Hatfield, Pa , a division of EMS Acquisition Corp „ and NOA61 ™ (a UV cured thiυl-ene based adhesive, available from Norland Company, Cranbury, N.J ) In another embodiment, the polarizer may be prepared as shown schematically in

Figure 1 Here, a prism mold I Qa, having an open first surface or face, and optional tabs 1 Ia and b, is combined with a polarizing layer 20 and πgid side plate 30. The angles between the mold faces may be varied as desired, and either or both outer faces 12a/b may be curved or have any desired pattern imparted thereto, such as a diffracting pattern, such as a Fresnel lens may be integrally molded. The respective first surfaces of the first and second prisms may also be curved, or have an integral microreplicated pattern. Advantageously, the curved first surfaces of the first and second prisms may configured so they may be mated, such as with a concave and convex surface, with the polarizing layer disposed therebetween. The parts IQa, 20 and 30 may be secured via clamps on tabs 1 la/b, or by other suitable means. A tensioning means (not shown) may be used to maintain the polarizing layer flat. The assembled mold may rest on a smooth, rigid surface 15, such as glass, or an integral bottom may be provided to the mold IQa. This assembly defines a prism shaped cavity 40a, into which the curable composition may be introduced, and cured by application of UV energy. If desired, a second rigid surface (not shown) may cover the top of the mold to protect it from atmospheric oxygen. Desirably, either rid surface 15 or second rigid surface is made of glass or other suitable material transparent to the incident light source for curing. Alternatively to the second rigid surface, the mold assembly may be blanketed with an inert glass to exclude oxygen. Upon cure, the rigid side plate 30 may be removed, and a second prism mold IQb secured thereto, forming a second chamber 40b, with the polarizing layer 20 forming the common faces between molds IQa and IQb, so that the first surfaces of the first and second prisms w i ll each be adjacent the polarizing layer As result of the curing the polarizing layer is now integral to the First surface of the first pnsm-shaped cured composition The second mυld may also have curved outer faces or other desired molded shapes (not shown) 1 his second chamber 40b may be filled with the curable composition, cured, the mold assembly removed to provide a polarizing beam splitter 60a having two prisms, and an integral polarizing layer disposed therebetween, on the respective first surfaces of the prisms I f" desired, the respective prisms may be provided, by a suitably configured mold, with integral interlocking tabs for securing the first and second prisms together or may comprise tabs for securing the beam splitter into a mount in a display device. Further, the first and/or second prisms may be providing with alignment means, such as tabs or indicators, for aligning the First and second prisms with respect to each other, the polarizing layer, and a mount in a display device.

The alignment means may comprise corresponding male and female portions that interconnect. The polarizing beams splitter may comprise a first prism and second prism, where first prism includes male portion, and second prism that includes female portion.

Male portion may be a rectangular surface that encompasses a portion of the surface of first prism adjacent to the reflective polarizing film, and which may project therefrom. Similarly, female portion may be a rectangular depression that is disposed within the majority of the surface of second prism adjacent to the reflective polarizing film. The male members and female portions may be substituted with other engagement mechanisms such that one prism includes at least one male member that is configured to engage with a respective female portion located in the opposing prism. Those of ordinary skill in the art will also readily appreciate that different numbers of the male members and the female portions than those exemplified herein may be used in accordance with the present disclosure. For example, an exemplary PBS may include three or more male members received within three or more female portions.

The male members and the female portions discussed above may be molded with the respective first and second prisms. The first and second prisms may then be secured together with the assistance of the male portions and the female portions to form polarizing beam splitters. This technique may involve placing the reflective polarizing film between the first prism and the second prism. The first prism may then be oriented relative to the second prism such that the male portion(s) are aligned with the eυrrt'bpυnding tern a Ie pυrtiυn(s). This alignment is beneficial for ensuring that the first prism is aceuratek positioned relative tυ the second prism T he first prism may then engage second prism by concurrently inserting male portions into the corresponding female portions This compresses the reflective polarizing Film between the incident surfaces of the first prism and the second prism to provide a smooth, planar interface. The male portion(s) may be secured to the corresponding female portions with an adhesive. Additionally, the First pπsm may be secured to the second pπsm by fitting and/or welding the male members to the corresponding female portions (eg , ultrasonic, infrared, heat staking, snap Fits, press fits, and chemical welding).

An alternate process is shown schematically in Figure 2. Here, two prism molds having open faces, 1 I Qa and 1 IQb (corresponding to the first surfaces of the resultant prisms) are secured together via optional tabs I l i a and b_(or any suitable means), with the polarizing layer 120 disposed between on the common first surfaces of molds 1 IQa and b. This creates two chambers 140a/b that may be filled with the curable composition, and cured to produce a polarizing beam splitter in a single step. Again, the molds may be of any suitable shape and size, and the exterior faces may be curved.

EXAMPLES

These examples are merely for illustrative purposes only and are not meant to be limiting on the scope of the appended claims. All parts, percentages, ratios, etc. in the examples and the rest of the specification are by weight, unless noted otherwise. Solvents and other reagents used were obtained from Sigma-Aldrich Chemical Company; Milwaukee, Wisconsin unless otherwise noted. Table of Abbreviations

Test Methods Molecular Weight Measurement by SEC

Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) for molecular weight and molecular weight distribution was performed using a Waters 717Plus autosampler, 1515 HPLC pump, 2410 differential detector, and the following Waters columns: Styragel HR 5E, Styragel HR 1. All samples were run in THF at 35°C with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Linear polystyrene standards were used for calibration. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) Measurement

DMA for I g and modul us determination ot cured compositions was pertormed using a LC-ARES Test Station ( Rheometπc Scientific, Piscataway, NJ) in a torsion mode The sample size was approximately 25 millimeters by 10 millimeters by 1 millimeter The length of the sample was measured by the test station and the width and thickness of the sample were measured with a caliper The test was performed by ramping the temperature from 25°C to 1 800C at 5°C per minute The frequency used was 1 Hertz

Yellowing Resistance Test The %Transmittance (%T) at a wavelength of 420 nanometers of 3 2 centimeter

( 1.25 inches) diameter by 0.5 centimeter (0.19 inch) thick cured samples was measured before and after 7 days aging in a 1200C oven. The %T was measured using a TCS Plus Spectrophotometer (BYK-Gardner USA, Silver Spring, MO). Generally, samples with %T at 420 nanometers of less than 85% display a yellow color. A sample is considered to have good yellowing resistance if the %T at 420 nanometers after aging is greater than 85%.

Volume shrinkage Determination

Density of the curable compositions and the cured materials were measured by a pycnometer. % volume shrinkage was calculated based on the density change during cure of the curable materials. % volume shrinkage = 100 x (density of cured material - density of curable material before cuτe)/density of curable material before cure.

Water Absorption Measurement

A weighed 3.2 centimeter (1.25 inches) diameter by 0.5 centimeter (0.19 inch) thick cured disk sample is placed in water at 23°C for 14 days. % water absorption = 100 x

(sample weight after 14 days in water — sample weight before water soaking)/sample weight before water soaking.

Birefringence Determination Transmission Spectral Ellipsometry (TSE) was used to measure retardance of the sample. Birefringence of the sample was determined by dividing the retardance by sample thickness. The sample is a round disc, 3.2 centimeter (1.25 inches) diameter by 0.5 centimeter (0 19 inch) thick T he sample was mounted on a rotating stage, and the I SE retardance data was measured at a series of positions using a J A Wool lam M2U0U Variable Angle Spectral Ellipsυmeter In-plane measurements were taken at 4 locations 6 millimeters apart in

orthogonal directions, for a total of 8 in-plane measurements The measured retardances were averaged in the wavelength range between λ ~ 545-555 nanometers.

Examples 1-7:

Preparation of Oligomer Syrups In Examples 1-7, IBOA, HEA, chain transfer agent IOTG or MCE, and the 1SI charge of thermal initiators Vazo 52 and 88, according to Table I , were added to a four neck flask equipped with a reflux condenser, thermometer, mechanical stirrer, and nitrogen gas inlet. The mixture was stirred and heated to 60°C under nitrogen. The temperature of the reaction mixture peaked at around 1500C during the polymerization. After the reaction peak, the batch was further polymerized at 1400C for 30 minutes with the addition of the 2nd initiator, Vazo 88, to reduce residual monomers and eliminate initiator. A sample was taken at the end of this reaction period for oligomer molecular weight determination by SEC. After that, the batch was cooled to 1000C. The HDDMA reactive diluent was added to the reactor to reduce viscosity of the batch. A solution of the DBDL catalyst in IEM was then added to the batch to react with the hydroxyls on the

IBOA/HEA polymer chains, incorporating methacrylate functional groups to the polymer. The reaction was complete in 2 hours. Preparation of Cured Samples:

After completion of the reaction, the reactive oligomer syrups of Table 1 were formulated with 0.02 weight % TPOL photoinitiator and cured by a Xenon Flash lamp according to the procedures described in the section Preparation of Test Samples. The cured samples were tested for % volume shrinkage, birefringence, Tg5 water absorption, % transmittance, and aging stability, using the methods described in the above Test Method section.

* The IBOA monomer and HDDMA reactive diluent in Examples 3,4 and 5 were purified by passing through a column of activated basic aluminum oxide powder, Brokmannl , -150 mesh, 58 A0, 155 m2/g, from Aldrich to remove inhibitors. The IEM monomer in the same examples was distilled to remove the inhibitor. The other ingredients in Examples 3, 4, and 5, and all ingredients in Examples 1 , 2, 6, and 7 were used as received from the vendors without purification.

Examples 8-10:

To prepare the reactive oligomer syrups of Examples 8-10, HDDMA reactive diluent, according to Table 2, was added to samples of the reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 7. The reactive oligomer syrups were formulated with 0.02 weight% TPOL photoinitiator and cured by a Xenon Flash lamp at 800C for 5 minutes. The cured samples were tested for % volume shrinkage, birefringence, Tg, water absorption, % transmittance, and aging stability, using the methods described in the above Test Method section.

Examples 1 1-12:

To prepare reactive oligomer syrups of Example 1 I and 12 in T able 3, the same polymerization procedure described in the Examples 1 -7 above was followed, except 30 minutes after the addition of the 2nd initiator at 1400C, MAnh was added and the mixture was reacted at 14O0C for another 3 hours with efficient stirring. After that, the batch was cooled down to I 100C and HDDMA reactive diluent was added to the reactor to further reduce the viscosity of the batch.

Table 3

Examples 13-14:

The reactive oligomer and reactive diluent mixtures, CN945A60, CN 1963 were formulated with 0.02% TPOL photo initiator and cured by a Xenon Flash lamp at 800C for 5 minutes according to procedures described in the preparation of test sample. Table 4

Preparation of Test Samples of Examples 1-14

Curable compositions with photoinitiator and other additives were prepared by preheating the oligomer syrups described in the Examples and Comparative Examples with a desired photoinitiator and other additives (if used) at 80°C and mixing in a white disposable cup by a DAC-100 mixer (both cup and mixer are available from Flack Tek Inc, Landrum, New Jersey). The compositions were degassed in a vacuum chamber and then allowed to cool to room temperature before use. Curing of the above curable materials was carried out by the following steps: I)

Onto a Pyrex glass plate approximately 15 centimeters (6 inches) by i 5 centimeters (6 inches) by 0.5 centimeter (0.19 inch) was placed an approximately 15 centimeters (6 inches) by 15 centimeters (6 inches) piece of 51 micrometers (2 mils) A31 release liner, 2) on top of the release liner was placed an approximate same size glass or silicone rubber mold with a 3 centimeter (1.25 inches) diameter opening at the center, 3) then the mold was filled with the curable compositions taking care to avoid bubbles, 4) then a second piece of approximately 15 centimeters (6 inches) by 15 centimeters (6 inches) of 51 micrometers (2 mils) A31 release liner was placed on top of the filled mold, 5) another Pyrex glass plate approximately 15 centimeters (6 inches) by 15 centimeters (6 inches) by 0.5 centimeter (0.19 inch) was placed on top of the release liner, and 6) finally, the filled mold was placed onto a heating station at 80°C in a chamber and allowed to equilibrate. The curable compositions were cured by a Xenon flash lamp (Model #4.2 Lamp Hsg, pulse rate of 8Hz) with RC-747 Pulsed UV/Visible System (Xenon Corporation, Woburn, MA) for 5 minutes. The weight average molecular weight which was measured by SEC5 the Tg which was measured by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), the % volume shrinkage which was determined by a pycnometer, and the birefringence which was measured by el lφbomctry are shown in Table 5 Visi bly noticeable cυlυr and % transmittance measured by the I CS Plus Spectrophotometer after 7 da\ s aging in a 1 2()°C oven are also shown in Table 5 Water absorption data obtained as descri bed in the Test Method section above are shown in Table 6.

Table 5

Table 6

Example 15:

In Examples 15, IBOA, HEA, chain transfer agent IOTG, and the 1st charge of thermal initiators Vazo 52 and 88, according to Table 1, were added to a four neck flask equipped with a reflux condenser, thermometer, mechanical stirrer, and nitrogen gas inlet. The mixture was stirred and heated to 600C under nitrogen. The temperature of the reaction mixture peaked at around 1800C during the polymerization. After the reaction peak, the batch was further polymerized at 1400C for 30 minutes with the addition of the 2nd initiator, Vazo 88, to reduce residual monomers and eliminate initiator. After that, the batch was cooled to 1200C and the IBOA reactive diluent was added to the reactor to reduce \ iscυsitv of the batch MAnh was then added to the batch to react with the hvdroxv] groups on the oligomer chains to incorporate methacrv late groups The reaction time was approximately 6 hours The HDDMA was then added and the solution was cooled to ambient The reactive oligomer syrups ot "I able 7 were formulated with 0 02 weight% Luciπn TPOL photoinitiator to make the curable material composition to prepare plastic prisms and PBS pπsms

Table 7

Example 16: Preparation of a plastic prism

For Example 16 the prism mold described in Figure 1 was used. Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was not used and component 30 was a glass microscope slide. The volume 40a was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 15 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 17: Preparation of a plastic PBS prism

For Example 17, the prism mold described in Figure 1 was used. Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was PBS FILM and component 30 was a glass microscope slide. The volume 40a was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 15 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes. The glass slide was removed and a plastic prism such as prepared in Example 16 was attached to the PBS FILM surface with the formulated reacti ve ol igomer syrup prepared in Example 1 5 used as an optical adhesi ve to generate a PBS prism The adhesive was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 18: Preparation of a plastic PBS prism

For Example 1 8, the prism molds described in Figure I were used Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was PBS FILM and component 30 was a glass microscope slide. The volume 40a was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 1 5 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes. The component 30 was then removed and a second mold I Ob was placed adjacent to the cured mold. The volume 40b was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 15 and a glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40b. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 19; Preparation of a plastic PBS prism

For Example 19, the prism molds described in Figure 2 were used. Components 110a and 110b were made of stainless steel with component 115 being a glass plate, component 120 was PBS FILM. The volumes on either side of 120 were filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 15 and another glass plate was placed on top of the filled volumes. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 20: Preparation of a plastic prism

For Example 20 the prism mold described in Figure 1 was used. Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was not used and component 30 was a glass microscope slide. The volume 40a was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 14 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes. Example 21 : Preparation of a plastic PBS prism

F or Lxample 2 1 , the pπsm mold described in Figure 1 was used Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was PBS FILM and component 30 was a glass microscope slide The v olume 40a was Tilled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 14 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature tor 5 minutes The glass slide was removed and a plastic pπsm such as prepared in Example 20 was attached to the PBS FILM surface with the syrup prepared in Example 14 used as an optical adhesive, to generate a PBS prism The adhesive was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 22: Preparation of a plastic PBS prism

For Example 22, the prism molds described in Figure 1 were used. Component 10a was made of stainless steel with component 15 being a glass plate, component 20 was PBS FILM and component 30 was a glass microscope slide. The volume 40a was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 14 and another glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40a. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes. The component 30 was then removed and a second mold 10b was placed adjacent to the cured mold. The volume 40b was filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 14 and a glass plate was placed on top of filled volume 40b. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

Example 23: Preparation of a plastic PBS prism For Example 23, the prism molds described in Figure 2 were used. Components

HOa and 110b were made of stainless steel with component 115 being a glass plate, component 120 was PBS FILM. The volumes on either side of 120 were filled with the formulated reactive oligomer syrup prepared in Example 14 and another glass plate was placed on top of the filled volumes. The assembly was cured with a Xenon flash lamp at room temperature for 5 minutes.

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2IBM J RES. DEVELOP, vol. 42, May 1998 (1998-05-01), pages 387 - 398
3L. H. SPERLING: "Introduction to Physical Polymer Science, 2 nd Edition,", 1992, JOHN WILEY & SONS, pages: 357
4SCHNABEL: "Study on Polarizing Visible Light by Subwavelength-Period Metal-Stripe Gratings", OPTICAL ENGINEERING, vol. 38, no. 2, February 1999 (1999-02-01), pages 220 - 226
5 *See also references of EP1984433A4
6T. G. FOX, BULL. AM. PHYS. SOC., vol. 1, 1956, pages 123
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US897534618 May 201210 Mar 2015Sabic Global Technologies B.V.Polycarbonate copolymers via controlled radical polymerization
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